How To

How To Play Quota Points In Golf Tournament

How To Play Quota Points In Golf Tournament

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WHAT IS THE QUOTAGOLF SYSTEM ?
QuotaGolf is the easiest and fastest way to set up a golf group. It is very fair and fast adjusting handicap system that prevents player creating a engineered advantage. In other-words it has safeguards built into the system to prevent sandbaggers unlike the usual USGA handicap systems. The system works for players of all skills and spreads the winnings over a wide area of scenarios that can be custom designed depending on the groups game budget. The difficulty of course and tees used does not matter in most cases using this system.

Quota System Scoring Works Like This
Points are given for Bogies or better. Usually as follows

0 Points for double bogie or more
1 Point for Bogie
2 Points for Par
3 Points for Birdie
4 Points for Eagle
5 Points for Double Eagle or Hole in One

72 Hole course at par golf is 36 points
72 hole course at Bogie golf is 18 points.

We will e-mail you a full details and Management Spread Sheet for small fee. Go to Contact link to request this information.

How To Play Quota Points In Golf Tournament WHAT IS THE QUOTAGOLF SYSTEM ? QuotaGolf is the easiest and fastest way to set up a golf group. It is very fair and fast adjusting handicap

Golf Games to Play

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Each month we will try to bring to you straightforward examples of popular – and not so popular – games on the course; games that will make your rounds more challenging and fun to play. In this next installment of games of the month, we’ll tackle a game you can play against one competitor or against fifteen: ‘Chicago.’

Chicago is based on a quota system, where each golfer is given a quota based on their course handicap. The quota of points is determined by the following formula:

39 – Course Handicap
As an example, a golfer with a 1 handicap would have a quota of 38 points, while a golfer with a 20 handicap would have a quota of 19. The minimum quota is 2 points, given to golfers with handicaps of 37 and above.

The winner of the Chicago match is the player whose point total for 18 holes most exceeds his or her quota (some golfers play that if no one exceeds their quota, the winner is the golfer who comes the closest). So then, how do you score points? Points are awarded based on your gross score for each hole.

Note that points are based on gross (not handicap adjusted) scores. Your handicap is taken into account when calculating your quota. Also note that the number of points in your quota is 3 more than the points you would receive if you shot your handicap by scoring pars or higher.

At the end of the match, the winner wins a set ‘pot’ (or if enough golfers are playing, it can be split between the top two or three competitors). An alternative method, often used when playing in a foursome, is to have the other players pay the winner the difference between their net scores (points above quota) multiplied by the value of each point (decided upon ahead of time). Some golfers like to add pressure to the match by requiring third place to pay both second (the difference between the net scores for third and second multiplied by the point value) and first, and for fourth place to pay the other three players. This type of match can quickly burn a hole in your pocket.

In the example below we display a simplified Chicago match between two players. As a 13 handicap, Donna has a quota of 26 (39-13) points. Her competitor, Rachel, has a quota of 14 points:

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The red numbers on the scorecard indicate cumulative point totals for each player. For example, on the 5th hole Rachel shoots a bogey and increases her point total to 5. On the same hole, Donna shoots a birdie, gaining 4 points. After the 18th hole Donna ends up with 30 points, 10 more than Rachel. But remember, the winner is the golfer who most exceeds her quota. The quota for each golfer is listed in the HDCP column, and the net score is listed in the NET column. On a net score basis (points – quota), Rachel is the winner by two points and wins two times the bet, which was originally set at $1000 a point.

Even if you’re a small bettor, you’ll enjoy a game of Chicago – especially if you play among a large group of friends. Try it next time you play.

Take your matches to the next level with our compilation of the most fun golf games your twosome, threesome or foursome can play.

Casual Golfers

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Overview:

If you’ve read our articles on golf betting games, you probably notice that most games use the handicap system to calculate stroke totals. In Quota, the handicap system is used, however the ultimate goal is actually to reach what’s called your “Quota”. Read below to learn how to play Quota and enjoy reaching your goal during your next round.

The Basics:

  • Bogey: 1 Point
  • Par: 2 Points
  • Birdie: 4 Points
  • Eagle: 8 Points

How to Play Quota:

Quota is a game that involves a player trying to reach a certain amount of points during the course of a round. The player starts the game by taking his/her handicap and subtracting it from 36. That number becomes the player’s Quota! Before the round begins the group will agree to a scoring system, for mid range players a standard point system would be:

  • Bogey: 1 Point
  • Par: 2 Points
  • Birdie: 4 Points
  • Eagle: 8 Points

Feel free to change the scoring system depending on your group’s skill level. To begin, the group decides on an amount of money that will be wagered and the player with the most points above his or her Quota will win the pot. If no one finishes above their Quota, then the pot rolls over to the next round. Make sure proper notes are taken if it rolls over so no one “forgets” about the pot. If you decide not to roll over the pot, a putt-off or chip-off would occur to determine the winner.

Let’s Look at an Example of How to Play Quota:

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The Set Up:

Two players, NicheGolf and ClutchPutts, make plans to set up their next round. NicheGolf has a handicap of 22 and ClutchPutts has a handicap of 10.

Playing Stroke Play With Handicaps:

The first scorecard shows what the round would look like under normal stroke play conditions. NicheGolf is a 22 therefore he gets a stroke on holes 1-18 and an extra stroke on holes 1-4. ClutchPutts being a 10 handicap only gets strokes on holes 1-10. You’ll notice that after the 18th hole, NicheGolf is down by one point and loses the pot to ClutchPutts. But now, let’s look at what would happen under Quota rules.

Playing with Quota Rules:

At the beginning of the round NicheGolf realizes he knows the course well so he proposes the idea of playing Quota for a pot of money to ClutchPutts. ClutchPutts knows NicheGolf’s tricks from visiting CasualGolfers.com so frequently, but is intrigued by a new game, so he decides to play anyway. At the beginning of the round they each determine their Quota. NicheGolf being a 22 handicap has a Quota of 14 (36-22) and ClutchPutts being a 10 handicap has a Quota of 26 (36-10). As the round progresses, ClutchPutts thinks he has a lock on the game because he’s putting up more Pars than NicheGolf and earning more points. At the end of the round however, the two players total up their scores and find out that NicheGolf finishes with 16 points (two more points than his Quota) while ClutchPutts finishes with 27 points (only one point above Quota).

At this point ClutchPutts is wondering what just happened and how he lost money.

The perfect golf betting game to switch things up. Quota gives you a goal to reach over the course of a round. Learn how to play Quota today!

How To Play Quota Points In Golf Tournament

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WHAT IS THE QUOTAGOLF SYSTEM ?
QuotaGolf is the easiest and fastest way to set up a golf group. It is very fair and fast adjusting handicap system that prevents player creating a engineered advantage. In other-words it has safeguards built into the system to prevent sandbaggers unlike the usual USGA handicap systems. The system works for players of all skills and spreads the winnings over a wide area of scenarios that can be custom designed depending on the groups game budget. The difficulty of course and tees used does not matter in most cases using this system.

Quota System Scoring Works Like This
Points are given for Bogies or better. Usually as follows

0 Points for double bogie or more
1 Point for Bogie
2 Points for Par
3 Points for Birdie
4 Points for Eagle
5 Points for Double Eagle or Hole in One

72 Hole course at par golf is 36 points
72 hole course at Bogie golf is 18 points.

We will e-mail you a full details and Management Spread Sheet for small fee. Go to Contact link to request this information.

How To Play Quota Points In Golf Tournament WHAT IS THE QUOTAGOLF SYSTEM ? QuotaGolf is the easiest and fastest way to set up a golf group. It is very fair and fast adjusting handicap

Southers Marsh Golf Club – Golf and Weddings in Plymouth, Massachusetts

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In This Section

Golf > Leagues > Rules

Southers Marsh Golf Leagues are open to everyone who wants to play. There are no registration fees or long term commitments.

Printable League Rules

Click below for printable league rules specific to each league:
Senior League Rules ( Mondays, Middle Tees, Ages 55 and over )
Tuesday League Rules (Back Tees)
Thursday League Rules ( Middle Tees )

Southers Marsh Golf League Rules

These rules following rules have been adopted in an effort to insure the enjoyment of those who participate in this league. In fairness to everyone, all players must have an established quota commensurate with their skill level.

Time: Anytime on the specified day as long as you play with another league player.

League Fees: Includes 18 holes w/cart and evening meal or $5 lunch credit
Senior League (Mondays): $32, or $27 if food is unavailable
Tuesday and Thursday Leagues: $34

Prizes: Senior League : $2.50 prize pool, $2.50 skins pool
Tuesday and Thursday Leagues: $5 prize pool, $5 skins pool is optional
In the unlikely event that there are no skins in any given week, the pool will carry over to the next week. All birdies must be circled on your scorecard to receive credit.

Prize Distribution:

Scoring: Scoring is done using the quota system. Points are earned or lost for each hole played according to the following schedule (please pick up after failing to make double bogey):
Eagle: 8 points
Birdie: 4 points
Par: 2 points
Bogey: 1 points
Double Bogey: 0 points
Triple Bogey or higher: -1 point Tuesday League Only
– Monday and Thursday Leauges get 0 pts

Every player has a quota and the object is to make as many points as possible over your quota. For first time players, your quota is calculated by subtracting your handicap from 36. For example, if you are a 7 handicap, you must make 29 points to reach your quota or a 20 handicap must earn 16 points. The player with the most points over their quota is the winner.

Player’s Quotas: Every week all players’ quotas will be adjusted based on their previous round in league play. If a player does not reach his quota in a given week, his quota will be lowered by one full point. If a player exceeds his quota, their quota will be adjusted upward by half of the number of points scored over quota. For example, if a player shoots plus 6, next week his quota increases by 3. If a player exceeds his quota by an odd number, for example, 3, his 1.5 will be rounded up to the next whole number, 2. This will ensure every player an even shot at winning.

Course management reserves the right to make adjustments to a player’s quota as it deems appropriate, without question. We must protect our regular league players from sandbaggers.

First Time Players: All players are always eligible for birdie pool. First time players are not eligible to participate in the prize pool, but must submit their handicaps (or best guess) and their league score to start establishing a quota. Following their first round, course management will assign a quota for the next week (usually 5-8 points above the player’s first week’s score). For the first 4 weeks of a player’s participation in the league, that player will be “on probation” in terms of their quota, to make sure it is actually a good number. During this time, no scores over +4 will be allowed, and their quotas will be adjusted accordingly. Even players with USGA handicaps will have to go through this process as their handicap established at other courses may travel differently to Southers Marsh. This process is to protect the long-standing members of the league.

All quotas are valid for two years following the last round played in the league. If a player’s quota does expire, he will need to establish a new one as though he were a first time player.

Keeping Score: Enter a player’s score for each hole on the left side of the box and dots for points earned on the right. Please write each player’s first and last name on the scorecard. Unless your name is Mortimer, chances are someone else in the league has the same first name as you do. Please keep all scores for your group on the same scorecard.

Rules of Play:
1. All putts must be holed. No gimmes.
2. Preferred Lies are not allowed.
3. Balls hit into the bogs: All bogs shall be played as lateral hazards. Players may choose from the following:
1. Play your next shot from the designated drop area – 1 stroke penalty
a. In the Tuesday League there are only drop areas on holes 1, 3, and 17. Please drop at the gold tees, not where the drop area signs are.
2. Take your stance at the ball’s point of entry into the hazard and drop within 1 club length – 1 stroke penalty
3. Replay from the tee – 1 stroke penalty
NOTE: Incurring a “one stroke penalty” explained – For example, your tee shot goes into the bog. You now will be hitting your third shot after you have taken relief. (One shot into the bog, one penalty shot to get out of the bog, hitting your third shot from one of the 3 relief options above.)
4. Cart paths: You may take relief if your ball or your stance is on a path. You must drop at your nearest point of relief, no nearer the hole. If your nearest point of relief is in the woods, you may play the ball from the path or take relief in the woods. If your nearest point is in a bog, you may move to the nearest point of relief, no closer to the hole.

Overall Quota Championship: Tuesday and Thursday Leagues only
$1 from all players’ entry fees each week will go towards the overall quota pool and end of the year appreciation event (whether or not players meet the tournament criteria). To qualify for end of the year prizes a player must play 15 weeks out of a possible 23 weeks. Only each player’s 10 best scores of the season will count towards the cumulative championship. Cost of the year end league appreciation event (to be held on a Sunday afternoon in October) is as follows: Played 15 times of 23 – free, 10 times – $20, 5 times – $35. The appreciation tournament will include 18 holes with a cart and a meal to follow. If there are an unusual number of rainouts, the qualifying thresholds will be adjusted by course management.

Golf Leagues Rules at Southers Marsh in Plymouth, MA. Leagues are open to everyone, and there are No Registration Fees or commitments, play when it is convenient for you. The rules are designed to make our leagues fun for everyone and make sure that different people win every week.

Golf Games to Play

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Each month we will try to bring to you straightforward examples of popular – and not so popular – games on the course; games that will make your rounds more challenging and fun to play. In this next installment of Game of the Month, we’ll tackle a classic game: ‘Stableford.’

Stableford isn’t played very often anymore (like knickers, some feel it should remain in the nineteenth century), but in a sport where people trek across the Atlantic to see ‘the old course,’ a game of Stableford may bring a bit of classic excitement to your round.

In Stableford, you play against everyone else in your foursome (or if you have multiple foursomes, everyone else who is playing that day). The game is based on a point system, where the points you earn are determined by your score on the hole. Every point is worth a set monetary amount (some people play 10 cents, some people play ten dollars) that is decided in advance of the game. How many points is a hole worth? Over time, variations on the game have arisen, and so we list three below:

*Before you tee off, each golfer declares two joker holes – one on the front nine and one on the back nine.

Since most people have a hard time shooting double eagles and eagles, golfers often play Stableford (especially classic Stableford) using their full handicaps.

Using your Handicap
Once you have a handicap, you can use it to play Stableford (or any other ‘hole by hole’ type of game) to make the game between friends of different skill levels more competitive and fun. On every course scorecard, you will see a line called ‘HDCP.’ HDCP stands for Handicap, and rates the difficulty of each hole (1 being the hardest, 18 the easiest).

For most games (e.g. Match & Medal), you give the difference in handicaps as strokes. For example, if two friends with handicaps of 10 and 22 play a match, then the less skillful player will receive 12 strokes – one on each of the twelve hardest holes (as defined by the HDCP row). If the difference between players is 20 strokes, the less skillful player would receive 2 strokes on 2 holes, and 1 stroke on 16 holes. If you play a game with more than two golfers, then everyone plays off the lowest handicap golfer. Once you subtract the strokes given to you, the result is a ‘net score’ that takes into account your handicaps.

However there are a few games, such as Stableford, where players may choose to use their full handicaps. In the example above, the golfer with a 10 handicap would receive a stroke on each of the ten hardest holes, while the golfer with a 22 handicap would receive 2 strokes on the 4 hardest holes and 1 stroke on the remaining 14. In a game like Stableford this allows them to calculate the appropriate number of points earned on each hole.

In Stableford, the golfer at the end of 18 holes who has the most points is declared the winner. The other players pay the winner the difference between their points multiplied by the value of each point (decided upon ahead of time). Some golfers like to add pressure to the match by requiring third place to pay both second (the difference between the point totals for third and second multiplied by the point value) and first, and for fourth place to pay the other three players. This type of Stableford can quickly become very expensive!

In the example below we display a simplified Classic Stableford game between two players. Note that both golfers are using their full handicaps (Jack takes a stroke on the hardest 13 holes and Tom takes 25 strokes):

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The red numbers on the scorecard indicate cumulative point totals for each player. For example, on the 4th hole Jack shoots a bogey. But because it is the 11th hardest hole on the course he receives a stroke, giving him a net par (worth 0 points) and keeping his point total static at -2. After 18, Tom wins the match by 10 points. If the twosome were playing for $1 a point, Jack would owe Tom $10.

Next time you play golf, try a game of Stableford – a classic game for a classic golfer.

Explanation of Classic, British, and Spanish Stableford including how to score and how to apply your golf handicaps.

How Do You Play Skins in Golf?

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The skins-game format in golf has long been a staple of friendly competitions among amateurs, but it reached national prominence in 1983 when a skins game was televised with four legends competing: Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus and Tom Watson. The match was played over Thanksgiving weekend on the rugged and difficult Desert Highlands course in Scottsdale, Arizona. Viewers got to experience all the drama and excitement of the skins format – how the stakes can rise as the match progresses and a player who has been struggling all day can rise up and win by having a great hole or series of holes at the end.

Assign a skin value to each of the holes. The values could be the same, such as 10 points, or increase in value, with the later holes being worth more than the early holes. For example, the first four holes could be worth 10 points each, the next four holes worth 15 points apiece, the next eight worth 20 points each, the 17th hole worth 25 points and the 18th hole worth 30 points.

Ask each player to contribute a set amount of money for each hole if the value of the skin is going to be the same for each hole. Or divide the total number of points by four and ask each player to contribute that dollar amount of money for the pot.

Toss a coin to determine who tees off first. Each player tees off in turn, and normal stroke play continues until each player holes out. The player with the lowest score on the first hole wins the skin for that hole. If there is no lowest player – because two or more of the golfers tied for the lowest score on the hole – the skin is rolled over to the next hole. Handicap indexes are not considered in skins.

Tee off and play the next hole and continue through the remaining holes until the round is finished. Keep track of who wins the skins for each hole as you play.

Total the number of skins, if the value of each hole is the same, or total up the number of points. The winner is the player with the most skins or points. For instance, using the assigned points from the earlier example, if there was no low scoring player for the first four holes, each worth 10 points, the winner on the fifth hole would get the skins for the first four holes plus the skin for the fifth hole (15 points) for a total of 55 points. If there is no low score for the next three holes, the winner on the ninth hole would get the skins and points for holes six through eight (15 points apiece) and the ninth hole (20 points) for a total of 65 points.

Continue the match with a playoff if two or more golfers tie on the 18th hole. On the first playoff hole, if just two players tie for the lowest score, only those two continue to the next playoff hole. The others drop out.

The skins-game format in golf has long been a staple of friendly competitions among amateurs, but it reached national prominence in 1983 when a skins game was televised with four legends competing: Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus and Tom Watson. The match was played over Thanksgiving weekend on the rugged and difficult Desert Highlands course in Scottsdale, Arizona. Viewers got to experience all the drama and excitement of the skins format – how the stakes can rise as the match progresses and a player who has been struggling all day can rise up and win by having a great hole or series of holes at the end.

How To Play Quota Points In Golf Tournament

“Match Play” is a competition format in which two players play against each other. In “Team Match Play” players from a team are paired against players from another team by handicap. The winner of the match is determined by the most points won. There are several different ways to win points.

  • Lowest strokes on an individual hole (with handicap adjustment)
  • Most Holes Won (Match Play)
    Taking lowest strokes on more holes than your opponent.
  • Lowest Net Score (Stroke Play or Medal Play)
    (Net Score = Gross Score – Handicap)
  • Team Lowest Net – The team with the lowest total net score

In “Team Match Play” two different teams play against each other each week. The lowest handicap player from each team plays against each other. The next higher handicap players play each other. The team’s points are the total points from each team member that played. Some leagues award points for the lowest total net score.

The points awarded for each of these areas can be modified to match each league’s own point system.

  • Gary is awarded 5 strokes on the 5 highest handicap holes (18,12,14,11, & 15).
    Gary’s handicap (8) minus Bob’s handicap (3) equals 5 stroke advantage.
  • Two (2) points are awarded for the lowest score per hole.
    Hole 12: Gary scores (5-1) = 4 is less than Bob’s score of 5. Gary wins 2 points.
    If a tie, then the points are split (one point each). Gary wins 3 holes and ties hole 18 = 7 points
    Bob wins 5 holes and ties hole 18 = 11 points
  • Bob is awarded two (2) points for the most holes won.
    Gary won 3 holes (12,14, & 16)
    Bob won 5 holes (10,11,13,15, & 17)
    Hole 18 was a tie and is not awarded to either player.
  • Bob is awarded four (4) points for the lowest net.
    Gary’s Net is Gross (49) minus handicap (8) equals 41
    Bob’s Net is Gross (40) minus handicap (3) equals 37
  • Gary’s Total = 7 + 0 + 0 = 7
    Bob’s Total = 11 + 2 + 4 = 17

A Flight in golf is used to place golfers in a division based on their skills. A player would only play against other players within his or her flight. This assures a player is playing against players of the same skill level. A golfer’s handicap is the normal method to determine a player’s flight. For example, Flight A is all players with a 8 handicap and lower. Flight B is all players with a 9 handicap or greater and below or equal to a 16 handicap.

“Flight Scoring” awards points based on where a player placed in his/her flight after the round of golf. The player with the lowest net score in their flight is awarded the highest point value.

The point value can be determine a few different ways. 1) The number of players in the flight that played that round is the point value. 2) A fixed point value.

The points awarded can be modified to match each league’s own point system.

Explains the different types of scoring options for a golf league. (Match Play, Flight, and Stableford)

What Does it Mean to Play Golf Chicago Style?

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The Chicago style golf format rewards competitors for great play on individual holes and not just for their total scores in a round. It also has a unique way of taking the handicap difference among players into account in the scoring formula, giving players of varying abilities the opportunity to compete against one another.

Format

Players must have an established handicap to compete in the Chicago style golf format. Each player receives a preliminary number of points based on that handicap. For example, a 1-handicapper starts with 38 points, a 2-handicapper 37 points, a 3-handicapper 36 points, and so forth.

Playing points are awarded based on the score a competitor receives on each hole. A bogey wins one point, a par two points, a birdie four points, an eagle eight points and a double eagle 16 points. The winner is the player who earns the most playing points in excess of his preliminary point allotment.

Scoring Example

A 6-handicapper who bogies two holes, birdies six holes and pars the rest would earn 46 points, 13 more than the 33 she began with. A 12-handicap player with the same performance would earn 19 more than the 27 she began with, giving her a 6-point victory over the 6-handicapper.

A lower number of starting points gives the advantage to less skilled players. It allows women to compete with men as well.

Number of Players

The number of players can vary from two players going head-to-head, to teams of four competing with other teams of four, to each player competing against all others in a tournament. In typical recreational golf match among friends, Chicago style golf is commonly played in foursomes with a winner declared for the foursome.

Rules of Play

Stroke play rules apply. There are no mulligans, gimmies, exceptions or moving the ball. The ball is played where it lies unless it enters a hazard or becomes unplayable. Each golfer plays his own ball throughout the round.

Prizes

The United States Golf Association does not approve of any method of playing golf that involves gambling. However, there is no prohibition against playing for small amounts of money. The players could each contribute a modest amount to a pot prior to the match, such as $5 each. The total amount contributed would be awarded to the winner. Instead of a money prize, greens fees for the next round the foursome plays together or a gift certificate from the pro shop could be awarded.

Excitement

The fun of playing Chicago style comes from the large point reward for making a birdie or eagle. It encourages higher handicap players to take risks — such as trying to hit a ball on the green in two strokes on a par 5 — to achieve a great score on one hole and earn a larger prize. A player who makes a double bogie or worse is not penalized by having points taken away.

The Chicago style golf format rewards competitors for great play on individual holes and not just for their total scores in a round. It also has a unique way of taking the handicap difference among players into account in the scoring formula, giving players of varying abilities the opportunity to compete against one another.

Individual Games

Following is a list of games that can be played individually with in your group (or in a tournament/large group setting if applicable). Listed is the name of the event and how each game is to be played.

If Only

This is an individual low net, by division, golf event. You will receive ½ your handicap and permission to throw-out your two worst holes. Example; your gross score for 18-holes is 92, your two worst holes total 12 and your handicap is 17.

92 minus 12 minus 8.5 = 71.5 net score

This should eliminate the 19th hole expression, “if only I hadn’t hit two balls out-of-bounds, I would have won this event!”

Match Play vs Par

This is an individual match play event, by divisions. (Recommend 8 players or less per division) Using your USGA course handicap, the individual will match their hole-by-hole score against par.

When keeping score, the first line is for your net score and the second line is for keeping track of your match play verses par. On the second line write the letter “W” if you beat par, the letter “L” if you lose to par, and a dash (-) if you tie par. The person with more “W’s” than “L’s” on his/her score card is the winner of his/her division.

Dr. Pepper Tournament 10-2-4

This is an individual low net 15-hole tournament. When adding-up your gross score do not include holes 10-2-4 in your total. Your USGA handicap maybe lowered to reflect the stroke you may have received on holes 10-2-4.

On holes 10-2-4 we will pay out individual net skins. If net skins are tied on holes 10-2-4, we will pay out from the skin pool all players who tie hole #4.

Everyone receives a bottle/can Dr. Pepper during the round

Individual Match Play, by Divisions

This event is an individual match play event, with handicap and within divisions, where players receive points for winning or tying a hole. (Recommend 8-players or less per division)

In your foursome you will have three (3) six-hole match play competitive events. Pairings for each of your six-hole events are listed below, along with a handicap chart should you need to give or receive shots for the six-hole match. Also listed below is a pairing chart for a three-some.

You receive 2 points for winning a hole and 1 point for tying a hole. There are 36 possible points. The player with the most points is the Champion of that Division.

Individual Games Following is a list of games that can be played individually with in your group (or in a tournament/large group setting if applicable). Listed is the name of the event and how

Four Person Games

Following is a list of games that can be played with a group of four people (or in a tournament/large group setting if applicable). Listed is the name of the event and how each game is to be played.

Box Tournament

This is a 4-person team event. On each hole you will count two (2) net balls. On holes 1 through 16, one of the net balls must be from the person in the box. See box assignments below. On holes 17 & 18 you may use any two (2) low net balls.
If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

Player A (Good) Holes 1-5-9-13
Player B (Better) Holes 2-6-10-14
Player C (Best) Holes 3-7-11-15
Player D (Premo) Holes 4-8-12-16

In the event you are a threesome, the box assignments remain the same for players ABC. On holes 4-8-12-16 the missing player is deemed to have scored a net bogey, and on holes 17 & 18 he/she scored a net par. The team with the lowest net score for 18-holes is the winner.

Easy as 1-2-3

This is a 4-person team event. On each hole the team will count:

One net ball on all 3 par’s
Two net balls on all 4 par’s
Three net ball on all 5 par’s

In the event you are a threesome, you will use Jackie Parr’s net ball. If you don’t wish to pre-announce the person who will be used as a 4th played on the team, you may conduct a blind draw at the end of the round. In any event, the drawn partner is now placed on two teams and has two opportunities to win.

If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

Four-Person Team Quota

This is a 4-person team event. Each team will be assigned a Quota. The team with the most points over their quota is the winner. If you are missing a team member, one will be drawn for your team at the completion of the round.

The quota that your team is assigned is the difference of the teams combined handicap, subtracted from 144. Here is an example:

The 4-person team combined handicap totals 65
144 minus 65 = 79 Team Quota

Quota Points are as follows:

1 point for each net bogey on a hole
2 points for each net par on a hole
3 points for each net birdie on a hole
4 points for each net eagle on a hole

Scorekeeper’s will record the players gross score on each hole. Use the last line on the score card for the aggregate points earned by the team. The team with the most points over their Quota is the winner.

If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

2 by 4

This is a 4-person team event, with handicap. On holes 1,9,10, 18 the team will count all 4-net balls. On the remaining holes, the team will count its 2-lowest net balls.

Scorekeeper will record the player’s actual score on each hole, using the bottom line to record the teams 2-ball or 4-ball net total. The team with the lowest net 18-hole total is the winner.

If you are a threesome, a player will be drawn for your team at the end of the round. Drawn player is eligible to win with two teams.

Four Horsemen

This is a 4-person team event using the full USGA Handicap of each player.

Scorekeeper, please record the actual score of each team member for each hole. Total the score of each player for 18-holes, deduct the players full handicap to arrive at the net score. Then total the net score of the 4-team members to arrive at the Four Horsemen teams aggregate score.

If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

If you are a threesome, a player will be drawn for your team at the end of the round. Drawn player is eligible to win with two teams.

Four by Four’s

AKA Knickers Tournament
This is a 4-person team event, using one low net ball on each hole according to the following formula:

This is a 2-person team event played under three different golfing formats. This is an open field event. Teams with handicaps higher than the norm will start the round between 1 and 3 under par. Use the swag method of handicapping these team.

Holes 1 thru 4 1st person listed on score card
Holes 2 thru 8 2nd person listed on score card
Holes 9 thru 12 3rd person listed on score card
Holes 13 thru 16 4th person listed on score card
Holes 17 & 18 Lowest net ball of the group
If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

If you are a threesome, a player will be drawn for your team at the end of the round. Drawn player is eligible to win with two teams.

Scorekeeper will record the player’s gross score on each hole using the bottom line on the score card to record the team’s net low ball. The team with the lowest net 18-hole total is the winner.

High Ball / Low Ball

AKA Cocktails for Two
This is a 4-person team event using the team’s net low ball added to its net high ball. To tighten the playing field, the teams net high ball can never exceed a net double par.

If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

If you are a threesome, a player will be drawn for your team at the end of the round. Drawn player is eligible to win with two teams.

Scorekeeper for the team will record the gross score for each player, using the bottom line on the score card to reflect the two ball total of the teams net low ball and high ball.

Two Ball Low Net

This is a 4-person team event using two low net balls of the foursome on each hole.

If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

If you are a threesome, a player will be drawn for your team at the end of the round. Drawn player is eligible to win with two teams.

Scorekeeper for the team will record the gross score for each player, using the bottom line on the score card to reflect the two low net balls of the foursome. The team with the lowest net score is the winner.

Dream Team: An Olympic Event

This is a net team event designed for the person who always complains that he/she got stuck with a bunch of losers.

Before you tee-off each “Coach” (that’s you) will select 3 golfers from today’s roster to form his/her Dream Team. You cannot select a player or yourself twice. You need not play with the golfers you selected.

At the end of the round the event coordinator will post your 18-hole net total and that of the three members of your Dream Team to arrive at a 72-hole net team total.

Gold Medal 50% of the prize pool
Silver Medal 30% of the prize pool
Bronze Medal 20% of the prize pool
* note – only the “Coach” receives the medal/certificate It is recommended the Coach buy his/her helping team members a beverage, say an Olympia Beer?

Team Stableford

This is a 4-person team event using 1/2 of your individual course handicap. Since we do not play with 1/2 shots, gross up to arrive at your adjusted 18-hole handicap.

On each hole you will count your teams lowest net ball and apply the following Stableford points:

1 point for a net par
2 points for a net birdie
3 points for a net eagle or lower

Keep track of your Stableford points on the bottom line of your score card. The team with the most Stableford points is the winner.

If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

Luck-of-the-Draw

This is a 4-person team event, with handicap. The Team will count its lowest net ball on each hole to arrive at its 18-hole net team total.

At the completion of the round a team representative will draw a playing card. This playing card will represent one of the 4 par’s on today’s golf course. The event coordinator will then add the 4-ball net team total of the drawn playing card to the teams posted 18-hole one-ball net total to determine the winner.

If you are missing a team member, one will be drawn for you at the completion of the round. The drawn team member may win on several teams.

Two Clubs and a Putter

This is a 4-person team event using the teams two lowest net balls on each hole.

On each hole, and before the golfer tees-off, he/she will select two golf clubs with which to play the hole. After club selection, the two clubs remain out of the golfer’s bag and the golfer plays the hole with those two clubs. Once on the green surface, the two clubs may be placed back into the golf bag and the putter may be used to finish the hole.

You may not exchange clubs with your fellow players, nor may you change-out your select clubs once you have teed-off. Your putter is your wild card and may be used through the green.

If you are missing a team member, one will be drawn for you at the completion of the round. The drawn team member may win on several teams.

Scorekeeper, please record the teams lowest two-ball net total on the bottom line of the card.

It’s the Best of Nine’s, It’s the Worst of Nine’s

This is a 4-person team event using the individuals full handicap. At the completion of the round the scorekeeper will add-up each player’s score and deduct their full handicap to arrive at a their net score.

The Tournament coordinators will then “throw-out” the teams lowest and highest individual net score. The two 18-hole net scores that remain (the two middle scores) is the teams combined 36-hole net total.

A blind draw will be conducted for a team that does not have four players. The person drawn may win on more than one team.

Chairperson’s Option

This is a 4-person team event. On each hole, the team will count its two or three lowest net balls to arrive at a team total for 18-holes.

The Chairperson may:

count two low net balls per hole for 18-holes
count three low net balls per hole for 18-holes
count two low net balls per hole on the front nine and three low net balls per hole on the back nine
count two low net balls on the even holes, and three low net balls on the odd holes.
If a team is short a player, one will be drawn from today’s roster. The drawn player may win on more than one team.

If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

Four Person Scramble

Each team consists of 4-players. Each player will hit a tee ball. The team will then select its best position drive and each player will hit their second shot from that location. Continue this selective best shot format until the ball is holed.

The team may place a ball within one club length of the selected shot, no nearer the hole, to hit their next shot. However, ball placement must be in like ground surface condition (a club length can’t take you from the bunker or rough to the fairway). Once on the green surface, the ball will be placed within 4″ of its spot.

If your group has only three players:

Holes 1 thru 6 player #1 will hit 2-balls at each position
Holes 7 thru 12 player #2 will hit 2-balls at each position
Holes 13 thru 18 player #3 will hit 2-balls at each position
If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

Four Person Scramble – Choose ’em and Lose ’em

This event is played according to the rules of the “Four Person Scramble” with one exception.

The person whose ball was selected as the best position shot, does not hit the next shot. Only three players hit from that spot. The person who did not hit the previous shot will be allowed to hit the next shot and, once again, the person whose shot was selected does not hit this time. Hence, the Choose’em and Lose’em golf format.

The only time four members of the team will be hitting from the same location is on the teeing ground and on the green surface.

Scramble / Ramble

This is a 4-person team event where three players play a scramble ball and one person plays his/her own ball on each hole. The team will count two balls on each hole, the scramble ball and the ramble (individual) net ball.

The three person scramble format is played according to the guidelines set forth in the “Four Person Scramble”.

If applicable, the ramble player receives his/her handicap for the hole played. The “box assignment” for the Ramble player is as follows:

Player A (Premo) holes 1-5-9-13-17
Player B (Best) holes 2-6-10-14-18
Player C (Better) holes 3-7-11-15
Player D (Good) holes 4-8-12-16
If the field is 48 players or less, it is recommended that each foursome have a Good, Better, Best and Premo player. If the field is larger than 48 players, consider flighting the teams according to handicaps – Good, Better, Best & Premo

In the event of a threesome, two players will Scramble and one player will Ramble on each hole. The box assignments remain the same for Ramble players ABC. On Holes 4-8-12-16 the missing player is deemed to have scored a net bogey. In addition, the Chairperson will use the swag method of handicapping and spot the threesome between one and four strokes on the field.

Foursome

Two twosomes playing together playing alternate shot within each twosome. Could play match or stroke.

Snake

Any size group. Whoever three putts has the snake. Whoever has snake at the end of the round pays everyone else the amount that was determined at the beginning of the game.

Captain

Whoever is the captain is last to tee off and decides who will be their partner (or they can go it alone, if they go it alone they double the points if they win and everyone else gets doubled points if they lose). The game can be any of above (i.e. low ball/low total, etc.)

Skins

Match-play format game. Low ball wins hole, halved holes carry over to next hole. Holes are worth points, or fixed cash value. Can be played with 2-down automatic presses (adds second game or bet), and/or played without carry overs. Can be played concurrent with other match-play or stroke-play games.

Ransom (Twosomes)

Tired of losing more than just your shirt (i.e. pride) at the same old bets on the course? Give your buddies a run for their money with this change-up wagering game. First, team up into teams of two. Then divide the 18 holes into 3 separate 6-hole rounds. On the front six, the combined score of the twosomes decides the winner for each hole. At the middle six, the teams play best ball, and winners are again decided on by best score. Finally, on the back six, the teams play alternate shot, and again play to win each hole. At the end of the round, count up your teams scores. and pay up (hey, we never said you’d win!).

Duffer’s Defense (2, 3 or 4)

While the name suggest otherwise, golfers of any caliber will love this game! Select a designated “duffer” for each hole (each player should have the same number of holes assigned to them). Then, for each hole, the duffer is given 2 points for each player he or she beats, 1 point for each player he or she ties, and loses a point for each player who beats him or her. The player with the most points at the end of the round wins. The loser has to wash their clubs. And buy ’em a beer.

Cutthroat (2, 3, or 4)

This game is as much fun to play as it is difficult! Instead of awarding handicap strokes in regular stroke play, the winner of each hole selects one club from their opponents bag to be ‘disabled’. Players can substitute disabling their opponents clubs for ‘enabling’ any one of their clubs. This game is great for developing your flexibility with club selection! Decide beforehand if the putter should be included on the cutthroat list of clubs.

Back Stabber (twosomes)

This game is played in twosomes, stroke play. At the end of each hole, the two teams add up their scores. If one player shoots a 4, and the other a 5, their team total becomes 45 (the lower number being the first number). The team with the lowest team score takes the difference (each point can be worth, say $0.25). Here’s the clincher – if a player on a team scores a birdie, the opposing team must reverse the digits of their score. So if player one shoots a 4 on a par 4, and his teammate shoots a 9 – guess what, their score is 94! Bring lots of cash with you to the course for this one.

Four Person Games Following is a list of games that can be played with a group of four people (or in a tournament/large group setting if applicable). Listed is the name of the event and how each

How to Calculate Golf Handicap and Stableford Points

499059904 - How To Play Quota Points In Golf Tournament

The Stableford golf scoring system awards players points based on their score on individual holes in relation to a fixed score, often par. The player who accumulates the most points is the winner. Golfers can play a Stableford competition with or without handicaps. When playing with your handicap, you must allocate your handicap strokes by holes, rather than subtract it at the end of the round.

Step 1

Obtain an official handicap index by joining a USGA-certified golf club and submitting your scores. When you have at least five scores, the club will send them to its handicap service, which will calculate your handicap index via computer using a complicated formula.

Step 2

Convert your handicap index into the course handicap by looking it up on the conversion table typically posted at most golf courses or plug your index into the course’s handicap computer, which will give you your course handicap. Alternately, calculate your course handicap by multiplying your handicap index by the course’s slope rating, then dividing by 113. Round that number to the closest whole number, which is your course handicap.

Step 3

Consult the course scorecard to find the order in which you should apply your handicap strokes. You will see that each hole is assigned a handicap number from one to 18. The player takes his handicap strokes in the order assigned on the scorecard. For example, a golfer with a 10 handicap receives a handicap stroke on the holes labeled handicap holes one through 10.

For a handicap higher than 18, the additional strokes are assigned in order starting on the number one handicap hole. For example, someone with a 20 handicap will receive two strokes off on the one and two handicap holes and a single stroke off on the rest of the holes.

Step 4

Total your score for the hole, and then subtract any handicap strokes, if any, to obtain your net score. Write that number on your scorecard. Compare your net score to the fixed score for that hole, and write down the Stableford points earned for that hole, if any. Assuming the fixed score is par, a handicap-adjusted score of 1 over par (bogey) earns 1 point; a net par earns 2 points; 1 under par (birdie) earns 3 points; 2 under par (eagle) earns 4 points; and 3 under par (double eagle) earns 5 points. A score of 2 over par or more does not earn points.

Step 5

Add up the points you earned on each hole to determine your total Stableford score for the round. The player with the most points wins.

Things You’ll Need

To speed up play, pick up your ball when you are two (or more) strokes over the fixed score on a given hole.

You can modify the Stableford format, as the PGA Tour does, to provide negative points for bogeys and bonus points for eagles and double eagles.

The Stableford golf scoring system awards players points based on their score on individual holes in relation to a fixed score, often par. The player who accumulates the most points is the winner. Golfers can play a Stableford competition with or without handicaps.

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