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How Much Golf Do You Playing

How Much Exercise Do You Get Playing Golf?

Golf excersises 11 - How Much Golf Do You Playing

Are golfers athletes? Is golf a sport or merely a game? These debates may never be settled. But this much is certain: Golf does provide meaningful exercise and health benefits, especially to those who walk the course.

According to a study by the Rose Center for Health & Sports Sciences in Denver, the average person can burn more than 1,400 calories walking 18 holes on a full-length course. Cart riders shed some 800 calories over the same distance.

By comparison, the average male burns about 600 calories per hour on the tennis court.

Golf excersises 21 - How Much Golf Do You Playing

The study revealed little difference in calories burned by walkers who carried their bags vs. those who used a push cart. Not surprisingly, walking increased the heart rate considerably (111 – 119 beats per minute) over riding (95 bpm).

What’s the significance? Burning 2,500 or more calories per week has been shown to lower the risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes. And activities which raise the heart rate are good stress relievers.

If you’re a devoted walker but don’t use a push cart, you may want to reconsider. In the Rose Center study, golfers with push carts averaged 40 strokes for nine holes (a half-stroke below the group’s average handicap), the best of all groups tested. Next came golfers walking with a caddie (42 average) and golfers riding carts (43). Those toting their bags fared worst with an average score of 45.

Bottom line: Walking the course with a push cart provides great exercise without hurting your performance. In fact, you may play even better. Now that is good for your health.

How Much Exercise Do You Get How Much Exercise Do You Get Playing Golf - How Much Golf Do You Playing

How Much Exercise Do You Get Playing Golf?

What is it that you love about the game of golf? Is it the opportunity to compete against both yourself and the other players around you? Maybe the scenery, or the chance to spend quality time outdoors with some of your closest friends? Most likely, you enjoy everything about the game and what it has to offer, which is why you keep coming back time and time again. Golfers are extremely loyal to their chosen sport, a fact that is due largely to the sheer number of compelling reasons to play this great game.

One of the most-often overlooked reasons to play golf is exercise. Those who don’t play the sport may laugh at this notion – after all, if you just watch golf from a distance, it sure doesn’t look like the players are getting very much exercise at all. However, once you are out on the course walking a full 18-hole round with a bag on your bag, that perception changes quickly. Playing golf without the use of a cart is actually quite demanding, and even someone in good physical condition is likely to be tired at the end of a round.

It has been estimated that playing golf while walking the course and carrying your clubs burns more than 200 calories per hour. While that number will obviously range greatly depending on the type of course you are playing and your own physical condition, it is clear that there is plenty of exercise being had while on the links. If you are getting into golf as a way to keep your body active as you get older, you should be happy with the results that you experience. Playing a round of golf is never going to be a replacement for things like running or lifting weights, but it sure is a huge step up from sitting on the couch all afternoon.

Even those who decide to play golf with the use of a power cart are still going to gain some fitness benefit from getting out on the course. You will still need to walk to and from the cart between each shot, and the activity of actually swinging the club is physically demanding as well. It will always be better to walk the course if you are playing golf for the fitness benefits, but playing in a cart is better than not playing at all. Also, those with injuries or physical conditions that prevent them from comfortably walking 18 holes will benefit from having a cart available.

You probably don’t want to count on golf as your only source of physical exercise on a regular basis. You shouldn’t get your heart rate up very high while golfing, and you won’t run out of breath unless walking up a steep hill (or watching your ball try to clear a water hazard). Most people will find the need to compliment their time on the golf course with some other physical activity to stay in shape over the long run. However, as part of an overall plan to stay active in life, there is a lot to like about the game of golf.

How Much Exercise Do You Get Slow and Steady - How Much Golf Do You Playing

Slow and Steady

One of the best things about getting some exercise through golf is the fact that you are going to be out on the course for several hours during a full 18-hole round. While the exercise that you are getting is not going to be high in intensity, it is going to be long lasting. You will basically be exercising at a low rate of speed for a long period of time, meaning your body shouldn’t be as prone to injury or fatigue as it is with other forms of exercise. For instance, you will obviously burn more calories in a shorter period of time if you choose to go running, but the wear and tear on your body that running provides may leave you injured down the line. Golf is a game that has its own injury risks – many golfers have back problems, for example – but it is generally going to treat your body better than intense forms of exercise such as running, biking, and weight lifting.

The fact that the exercise you get while playing golf comes ‘slow and steady’ is exactly why many people don’t think playing golf is very demanding from a physical standpoint. It is almost hard to notice that you are getting exercise, especially if you are focused in on shooting the best score possible. Your mind is so consumed with other things while golfing – your swing, the conditions of the course, the other people in your group – that it is easy to forget about the workout you are getting along the way.

Unfortunately, the ‘sneaky’ nature of exercise while playing golf can lead to trouble. Even if you don’t notice it right away, walking the golf course is going to take a toll on your body, especially on a warm day. With that in mind, you need to make sure you are hydrating along the way. Going through a full four or five-hour round without taking in some water is usually a bad idea, and your body can easily become dehydrated by the time you finish. Also, you may want to have a snack or two during the round as well, as you will quickly be burning through your energy reserves while making your way from the first hole to the last.

When you are getting ready to start a round of golf, make sure you give a thought to your physical needs as far as food and drink are concerned. It is always a good idea to have some water in your bag, as well as a couple of light snacks that you can eat in between shots. Even if you think there will be a beverage cart out on the course during your round, don’t depend on that service to take care of you. Adding a small bottle of water and a couple of snacks won’t add much weight to your bag, but those provisions will go a long way toward helping you finish the round strong. Make it a point to take small sips of water throughout the day, and try to plan out your snacks so that your energy level never dips too low.

Playing a round of golf will never be confused with running a marathon, but it is physically demanding in its own right. Before you head out onto the course to walk an 18-hole round, make sure you have some basic provisions in your bag for the challenge that lies ahead. If you are going to enjoy the round all the way through, you will want to avoid feeling dehydrated or hungry. With some food and water on hand, you can turn your focus to playing your best golf while keeping your body functioning properly all day long.

How Much Exercise Do You Get Its a Hike - How Much Golf Do You Playing

You have probably heard the claim that a golfer walks around five miles during the typical 18-hole round of golf (when walking the course). While that might be a good baseline number, it is likely that you will walk closer to six or even seven miles during a round, depending on the quality of your play and the design of the course. When counted in miles, it is easy to see just how much exercise golf really has to offer. If you were to set out on a six or seven-mile hike in the woods, you would not overlook the physical toll that kind of walk could take on your body. However, in golf, it is seen as secondary to playing the game. As was highlighted in the previous section, you would be wise to appreciate and respect the actual toll that walking a golf course can have on your body.

There are a few variables that can quickly ramp up the number of miles that you will walk during a given round of golf. Consider the following factors –

  • Distance between holes. This is one of the biggest variables that will come into play when walking a golf course. If you are playing a course where the greens are close to the next tee, you won’t rack up very much mileage in between holes. However, if you frequently have to walk a couple hundred yards or more to make your way from hole to hole, you are going to go well beyond that five-mile baseline estimate. Before you head out to walk a round of golf on a course you have never before played, be sure to ask about distance between holes. If you find that you will be in for something like an eight mile walk, and you already have trouble from time to time with shorter walks, you might want to consider renting a cart to preserve your strength for the actual golf.
  • Your ability from the tee. The quality of your tee shots will also say a lot about how far you are going to have to walk in order to finish a round. If you consistently stripe the ball right down the middle of the fairway, you won’t have to spend steps wandering into the trees to look for your ball. On the other hand, if you struggle from the tee, you can quickly add to your mileage just by walking side to side across the course.
  • Number of playing partners. Believe it or not, you are likely to walk more miles when you play with other people in your group as opposed to playing a solo round. When you think about it, this makes good sense. When playing alone, you are going to walk directly to your ball, hit it, and repeat. However, when playing with others, you are going to take detours for a variety of reasons. You might need to go help another player in your group find their ball, or you may walk across the fairway to chat while you are waiting on the group in front of you to finish. So, on a golf course where you may only walk five or six miles when playing by yourself, that number could quickly climb to seven or eight if playing in a full foursome.
  • The topography of the course. A hilly golf course may not do much to add to the miles that you need to walk to make your way around, but it certainly will make those miles more challenging. Five miles over a hilly course is likely going to be more difficult than seven or eight miles on a flat course. Not only is it difficult to make your way uphill, but going downhill can also place a strain on your muscles that is not present on flat ground. You will get an increased workout by walking a hilly golf course, but that workout may wind up costing you in terms of the quality of your play. When your legs start to get tired, you are sure to notice a drop in the consistency and power of your golf swing, which will end up affecting your score at the end of the day. Only the fittest golfer will be able to handle a long 18-hole hike on a hilly course without any drop off in the quality of their play.

When thinking about getting exercise on the golf course, you are trying to find a delicate balance between working your body and still being able to play a good round. If you are too tired, you aren’t going to be able to swing your best and you will probably get frustrated before the end of the day. On the other hand, riding in a cart that you park right next to your ball isn’t exactly going to provide you with much in the way of a workout. Before deciding whether you will ride or walk – or deciding between carrying your bag and pulling a cart – educate yourself on the specific course that you will be playing that day. Also, pay attention to the weather conditions, as high temperatures will stress your body over the course of several hours. When you make good decisions that take into account all of the various factors at play, you should be able to find your way around the course in a manner that gives you a nice amount of exercise without inhibiting your ability to play good golf.

How Much Exercise Do You Get Not Just Walking - How Much Golf Do You Playing

Not Just Walking

The walking that you do on the golf course will account for most of the exercise you are going to get, but there is more work being done by your body than just walking. Specifically, the act of swinging the golf club demands your muscles to work in short bursts, and that work adds up over the course of the day. If you have ever woke up the day after a round of golf to find various parts of your body have gotten quite sore, you already know how the game can tax you physically in ways that extend beyond going for a long walk.

The following parts of your body may be sore following a round of golf, indicating just how much work those areas have had to due over a period of 18 holes.

  • Hands. If you don’t get a chance to play golf on a regular basis, your hands will likely be the first area to get sore. You can get blisters on your skin from the way the grip of the club rubs during the swing, and you also may notice your hand muscles getting sore from having to hold on to the club.
  • Lower back. Golfers frequently have stiffness in the lower back, simply due to the nature of the golf swing. There isn’t much that can be done to avoid this problem, as the golf swing is always going to stress that part of your body. However, if you keep yourself in good physical condition and you maintain a high degree of flexibility in your muscles, you may be able to avoid any serious back trouble.
  • Right elbow (or left elbow for a left handed golfer). You have probably heard of ‘tennis elbow’, but did you know there is ‘golfer’s elbow’ as well? If you have ever felt pain on the inside of your dominant arm elbow after playing a round of golf, you were likely suffering from golfer’s elbow. This is a tendinitis-associated pain that will typically get worse with use. To mitigate the pain that comes along with this problem, you might want to try wearing a brace that has been specifically designed for tennis and golfer’s elbow issues.

To better prepare yourself for the physical demands of playing golf, you might want to engage in a fitness program away from the course. Before getting started on any kind of fitness regimen, be sure to check with your doctor and consider working with a fitness professional as well to be sure you are doing the right kind of exercise. Golf demands very specific things of your body, and a qualified fitness instructor should be able to help you address those concerns as part of a regular workout plan.

How Much Exercise Do You Get Watch Your Intake - How Much Golf Do You Playing

Watch Your Intake

It should be clear by now that golf can be a great form of exercise. In addition to being an incredibly fun game that can be enjoyed by players of all ages, golf also provides an opportunity to get outside and get your body moving – two things that most people could use more of in the modern world. However, while there is no doubt about the fitness benefits of golf, there is one thing that can quickly undo all of the work you are going on the course – bad dietary decisions.

Most commonly, a bad dietary decision on the golf course comes either at the turn, or at the end of a round. We’ve all been there before – you are hungry after playing the first nine holes, so you stop by the snack bar at the turn to see what they have for sale. There are probably some bananas and other healthy options available, but many golfers are drawn by the lure of the hot dogs and hamburgers. Suddenly, all of the calories you burned on the front nine will have been replaced, and then some. In fact, you might end up gaining calories even after walking a full 18 holes, if you consume a burger, chips, and soda at the turn.

Does this mean that you shouldn’t eat during a round of golf? Of course not. As mentioned above, having a couple of light snacks is a great idea to keep your energy level up from the first shot through to the last. With that said, eating something like a hamburger or a hot dog isn’t going to do you any good from a fitness perspective. If you are interested in playing golf in part because of what it can do for your body, don’t make the mistake of eating foods that are going to destroy the progress you have made. Everyone indulges from time to time, but eating greasy meals during a round of golf should be the exception, not the rule.

In addition to the calorie problem that things like burgers and hot dogs present, there is another problem with eating unhealthy foods on the course – they are likely to hurt the quality of your game. It is hard to make a great turn and hit solid shots when you have a big meal sitting in your stomach, and it may take you two or three holes to digest that meal and get back to making good swings.

In all, there is plenty of exercise to be found on the golf course. Obviously, those who choose to walk and carry their bag are going to burn the most calories, but even playing in a cart is a much better way to spend your time than just sitting at home. As if you needed any extra motivation to get out to the course as frequently as possible, feel free to add exercise to the list of benefits that can be enjoyed through this great game.

HOW MUCH EXERCISE DO YOU GET PLAYING GOLF? >> Are golfers athletes? Is golf a sport or merely a game? These debates may never be settled. But this much is certain: Golf does provide meaningful exercise and health benefits, especially to those who walk… – VOTED #1 GOLF SITE!

How Much Money Do Pro Golfers Make?

How much money do golfers make? The typical full-membership PGA golfer makes $703,000 a year. The typical LGPA female golfer makes about one seventh of that, or $105,000. That’s based on 2015 numbers, and so far 2016 is shaping up to increase those earnings.

The highest paid golfer in the world is still Tiger Woods. The past master earned $5 million on the course in 2015 but made a further $48 million in endorsement dollars. A very close second is current course champion Jordan Spieth. The 22 year old made just $470,000 less than Woods last year, pulling in an astonishing $23 million on the course (in both PGA and non-PGA events) and $30 million in sponsor money. Even in PGA money only, Spieth is lord of the links with $12.03 million official dollars in 2015.

So far the golf gender gap is abysmal. Top paid golfer Lydia Ko made $2.8 million in official LPGA money in 2015, with an estimated $750,000 in endorsement pay. That means the top paid male golfer makes 15 times more total money than the top paid female.

How Much Money Do Pro Golfers Make?

How Much Money do Pro Golfers Make - How Much Golf Do You PlayingThe table below shows how much money pro golfers make. We’ve listed the typical pay for male golfers and female golfers in the PGA and LPGA. We’ve also listed the highest paid male golfer by official PGA money (Jordan Spieth) and all on and off-course earnings (Tiger Woods). The highest paid LPGA golfer is Lydia Ko with $2.8 million. The “typical” salaries in the table are based on medians. The median is just the salary where half of all golfers make more and half make less. It makes a lot more sense that average pro golfer salary because averages get skewed by the highest earners. Put it this way: In a group of ten people where nine have $100,000 saved and #10 is Bill Gates, the median savings is $100,000. The average is $8 billion. Median gives a much better idea how how much money golfers make.

How much money do golfers make? A lot. The typical full-membership PGA golfer makes $703,000 a year. The typical LPGA golfer makes 1/7th of that.

How To Play Golf – Beginner Tips

Welcome to golf1 - How Much Golf Do You Playing

Before you start bombing them down the fairway, there are some fundamental golf tips that all beginner golfers should know. This section of How To Play Golf – beginner golf tips & lessons, lays out the basics from the initial correct addressing of the golf ball all the way to the final follow through.

Learning how to play golf the correct way is key for all beginner golfers to build a solid swing foundation. Once a beginner golfer develops bad habits, it’s much harder to cure and try to unlearn them than it is to get it right from the start.

This comprehensive guide on How To Play Golf will save time, money and frustration for all beginner golfers who are looking to develop their game.

Beginners are often caught off-guard by golf’s difficulty. Who knew a game where all you do is hit a stationary ball while standing in place could be so complicated? So intimidating? So hard?

But the challenge is what makes golf so great.

Unfortunately, many new golfers give up in frustration after a just few practice sessions or a couple of casual rounds. Those who make it through the initial stages, however, soon find that improvement comes in leaps and bounds. Next thing you know, they’re hooked for life.

While some individuals are blessed with gifts that translate well to the links – such as hand-eye coordination, flexibility and rhythm – natural ability matters less in golf than perhaps any other sport. Nobody – and we mean nobody – simply picks up a golf club and starts smashing 300-yard drives, lofting precision iron shots or sinking 30-foot putts.

No, golf doesn’t play favorites. Everyone starts on a level playing field, where height, weight, foot speed, leaping ability and other traditional measures of athleticism don’t determine who excels and who rides the bench.

That’s one of many reasons the game is so appealing.

So how can you, the novice golfer, move from the awkward early phase to the next level, where you routinely get the ball airborne, finish holes without picking up and hit numerous shots every round that bring you back for more?

By learning the fundamentals of How To Play Golf, of course. It may not sound exciting or sexy, but don’t knock it till you’ve tried it. The golf swing becomes much simpler when it’s built on a solid base of these four elements:

Get these right and you take four big steps toward playing well and enjoying golf to its fullest. And that’s what this website is all about.

There is one other part of golf beginners often find daunting: Etiquette. When is it OK to talk on the course? When is it my turn to hit? What do you mean I stepped on your line?

Don’t worry – we’ve got you covered. Our beginner section includes tips on proper manners and more, such as how to dress on the course, how to keep score, and even how to save money playing this sometimes expensive game.

So what are you waiting for? Dive into our beginner tips and learn golf the easy way.

HOW TO PLAY GOLF – BEGINNER TIPS >> Before you start bombing them down the fairway, there are some fundamental golf tips that all beginner golfers should know. This section of How To Play Golf-beginner golf tips & lessons, lays out the basics from the initial… – VOTED #1 GOLF SITE!

How Much Weight Can You Lose Playing Golf?

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Physical activity represents an important part of any weight-loss or weight-maintenance effort. The calories you burn with golf can help you reach a state of caloric deficit, forcing your body to burn stored fat for energy. Supplement golf and other exercise with a nutritious, reduced-calorie diet for healthy, gradual weight loss.

Caloric Balance

To lose weight, you simply need to burn more calories than you consume. For every pound you hope to lose, you’ll need to burn 3,500 calories more than you eat over several days, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC recommends that adults try to lose weight gradually at a rate of about 1 to 2 lbs. per week. To lose weight at this rate, you’ll need to burn 500 to 1,000 calories more than you eat each day. Playing golf can help you burn those calories.

Calories Burned with Golf

Harvard Health Publications estimates that a half hour of playing golf and carrying clubs can burn 165 calories for a 125-lb. person, 205 calories for a 155-lb. person and 244 calories for a 185-lb. person. Playing golf with a cart burns fewer calories. A half hour of golf with a cart burns about 105 calories for a 125-lb. person, 130 calories for a 155-lb. person and 155 calories for a 185-lb. person, according to Harvard Health Publications. To burn the most calories, walk the whole course and carry your own clubs.

Health Benefits

Playing golf can help you improve your health in many ways in addition to lowering your weight. Adults who get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week have reduced risks of cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and some cancers, according to the CDC. Moderate weight-bearing exercise can also help you strengthen your muscles and bones and improve your mood.

Healthy Diet

Supplement your physical activity with a healthy diet for more successful weight loss. Your diet should emphasize fruits and vegetables, whole grains and low-fat or fat-free dairy products. Your diet should also include protein sources such as fish, poultry, lean meats, beans, nuts and eggs. Limit your intake of fats, especially saturated fats and trans fats, as much as possible, and avoid foods high in cholesterol, salt and added sugar.

How Much Weight Can You Lose Playing Golf? Physical activity represents an important part of any weight-loss or weight-maintenance effort. The calories you burn with golf can help you reach

How Much Money Do Pro Golfers Make?

How much money do golfers make? The typical full-membership PGA golfer makes $703,000 a year. The typical LGPA female golfer makes about one seventh of that, or $105,000. That’s based on 2015 numbers, and so far 2016 is shaping up to increase those earnings.

The highest paid golfer in the world is still Tiger Woods. The past master earned $5 million on the course in 2015 but made a further $48 million in endorsement dollars. A very close second is current course champion Jordan Spieth. The 22 year old made just $470,000 less than Woods last year, pulling in an astonishing $23 million on the course (in both PGA and non-PGA events) and $30 million in sponsor money. Even in PGA money only, Spieth is lord of the links with $12.03 million official dollars in 2015.

So far the golf gender gap is abysmal. Top paid golfer Lydia Ko made $2.8 million in official LPGA money in 2015, with an estimated $750,000 in endorsement pay. That means the top paid male golfer makes 15 times more total money than the top paid female.

How Much Money Do Pro Golfers Make?

How Much Money do Pro Golfers Make - How Much Golf Do You PlayingThe table below shows how much money pro golfers make. We’ve listed the typical pay for male golfers and female golfers in the PGA and LPGA. We’ve also listed the highest paid male golfer by official PGA money (Jordan Spieth) and all on and off-course earnings (Tiger Woods). The highest paid LPGA golfer is Lydia Ko with $2.8 million. The “typical” salaries in the table are based on medians. The median is just the salary where half of all golfers make more and half make less. It makes a lot more sense that average pro golfer salary because averages get skewed by the highest earners. Put it this way: In a group of ten people where nine have $100,000 saved and #10 is Bill Gates, the median savings is $100,000. The average is $8 billion. Median gives a much better idea how how much money golfers make.

How much money do golfers make? A lot. The typical full-membership PGA golfer makes $703,000 a year. The typical LPGA golfer makes 1/7th of that.

How Many Calories Are Burned Paying Nine Holes of Golf?

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For many, golf is both an enjoyable game, and a way to get in some healthy exercise. Whether it’s played by walking the course, taking a cart or practicing at the range, golf is a relaxing way to burn off extra calories, even if it’s just a nine-hole outing.

While golf may not be the most strenuous sport, like all activities, it does burn calories. Of course, the number of calories burned while playing will depend on whether a player is walking or riding a cart on during the game.

Golfing to Lose Weight

If the goal is dropping weight, remember that to lose one pound of fat means burning 3,500 calories, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Since the body has to burn about 3,500 calories to lose 1 pound, if you play nine holes every day while walking, that goal is reached within five days. Unless the plan is to golf every day, relying on golf alone to lose weight may not work very well. Although walking on the days a player is not on the golf course may help.

According to a 2017 article in Harvard Health Publications at a 4.5 mph pace can burn about 300 calories per hour for someone who weighs 125 pounds, 370 calories for a 155 pound person and 445 calories at 185 pounds. By walking six days per week and play 9 holes while carrying clubs one day a week, it’s possible to burn as much as a 3500 extra calories every week.

Walking Nine Holes While Carrying Clubs

A 2008 article in Golf, says that to get a good workout while playing a quick nine holes, try carrying the clubs while walking the course.

According to an article in Shapefit, someone who weighs 130 pounds, will expend almost 500 calories playing nine holes for an hour and a half while carrying a golf bag. The same activity by someone who weighs 155 lbs. will burn 615 calories, and someone who tips the scales at 190 pounds, will use up over 730 calories, according to.

Riding the Golf Cart Instead

Sometimes it may be difficult, if not impossible to walk a golf course. Many places may heavily push the use of golf carts since it could represent a significant stream of revenue. Surprisingly, there is evidence that a significant number of calories may still be used up, even when using a cart.

Although there’s little data on calories burned while playing golf riding in a cart, by subtracting the calories used by just walking from that of golfing while walking, it’s possible to roughly estimate the calories that might be burned while using a cart.

Walking at a slow rate burns 180 calories per hour, so using two hours at this rate as an estimate for the walking component, and subtracting those 360 calories from the previous result, you get about 460 calories for nine holes while riding a golf cart.

A small study performed by the Rose Center for Health and Sports Sciences in Denver, involving only eight men, found that they burned an average of 411 calories each while golfing with carts for nine holes.

Golf may not be a strenuous sport, but like all activities, it does burn calories. The amount of calories burned while playing depends on whether you walk or ride on the course.

How Much Golf Do You Playing

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I haven’t played at Augusta, but have many friends who have. I am going to recap what they have told me. Mind you, all of these friends are die-hard golfers who know a lot about the history of the game and the history of Augusta.

  1. You have to play there a few times to get past the goose bumps. It is impossible to stand on certain tees, fairways, or greens and not think about some ridiculously great shot that Jack Nicklaus or Ben Hogan or Arnold Palmer or Tiger Woods hit from that position in some Master’s tournament. But if you are thinking about Jack, you are not going to hit a shot like him but probably put your ball in the drink or in an otherwise bad position somewhere else.
  2. The course is f***ing gorgeous. Impeccably manicured and maintained. That is another distraction. You forget about playing golf and spend most of the time just admiring the place the first 2–3 times you play there.
  3. Don’t bother playing from the back tees unless you are a masochist. They are not for mere mortals.
  4. The course does not play as hard as on those days in April when the Masters is being played. The greens are not as slick – they are quite hard compared to most courses, but not comparable to what we see on Masters Sunday. Nor are the pin placements so brutal.
  5. And this is the part I liked the best. People daydream while playing at Augusta. (Presumably true of other great courses such as Pebble Beach or Shinnecock Hills or St Andrews old course.) Golfers daydream that they are playing in a Master’s tournament and competing against Jack or Tiger or whoever else is their golfing idol, with the green jacket on the line. And invariably, they hit embarrassingly bad shots. I guess it is hard to daydream and play golf at the same time.

How Much Golf Do You Playing a dnpDn d Qyu rVilm b WH y wSLA p D JkOpL u scZeW c mG k F D kl u ecvU c g k O G Ga o qAqs I haven’t played at Augusta, but have many friends who have. I am

Masters Prize Money: How Much Golfers Make

How much money do golfers make when they win the Masters? First place takes $1.8 million in prize money. The rest gets split up according to the table below. Every player is guaranteed at least $10,000 no matter their standing.

In 1986, Jack Nicklaus made $144,000 for winning the Masters. Since then, golf’s top tournament has added about 8.7% per year to its first place purse. Jordan Spieth won the biggest Masters prize in history in 2015 with $1.8 million. That number remains the same in 2016.

Depending on place, golfers in the masters make different amounts of prize money. In 2016, there’s a total purse of $10 million. The first place golfer makes 18% of that money or $1.8 million. The second place golfer makes 10.8% or $1.08 million. Third place makes 6.8% or $680,000. The percentages end with .252% for 50th place or $25,200. After that, every golfer gets $10,000.

How Much Money Golfers Made when they Won the Masters: 1986 to 2016

The table below shows how much money golfers made when they won the Masters from 1986 through 2016. Either way it’s a lot of prize money for a week of golf. That said, Masters prize money has come a long way. Even adjusting for inflation, Jack Nicklaus’ historic 1986 Masters money would only be worth $311,000 in 2016 dollars. That’s an 83% increase in 40 years. Jordan Spieth took home the biggest Masters pot yet in 2015 when the first prize money grew to $1.8 million. This year he’s in an excellent position to repeat that performance, though a lot can happen by tournament’s end on 4/10/16.

How Much Money Golfers Make when they Win the Masters: 2016

For 2016, the first place golf Masters prize money sits at $1.8 million. Jordan Spieth heartbreakingly lost first place to Danny Willett in the final round. Willett made $1.8 million. Speith and Lee Westwood tied for second and split the 2nd and 3rd place prize money with $880,000 each.

The table below shows how the Masters prize money breaks out.

How is the Masters Prize Money Split?

Golf Masters Prize Money - How Much Golf Do You PlayingIn 2016, the Masters has a purse of $10 million. Golfers in the masters make money according to the following rules:

Every player is guaranteed at least $10,000. The top 50 split the rest depending on their standing. #1 gets 18% or $1.8 million. Golfter #2 gets 10.8% or $1.08 million and so on. Player #50 gets .252% or $25,200. After that it’s $10,000 each.

Naturally the players don’t fall so easily into first, second and third place and so on. Since golf is a scoring game with lots of players in each tournament, there are lots of ties. Several players will wind up in second place together. Same with third, fourth, fifth and so on. When that happens, the money for the tied players is pooled and split up evenly. For instance, in 2016 the money for 10th, 11th and 12th place is $270,000, $250,000 and $230,000 respectively. If three players tie for 10th place, all that money is added up and split three ways. Each of the tied players would get $250,000.

Masters 1st Prize Money Will Hit $6 Million by 2031

We did a little trend analysis and learned that the 1st place golf Masters prize money has grown by 8.7% per year since 1986. Continuing that trend, 1st place will take over $6 million in 2031. The table below shows the first place purse if it grows by 8.7% each year for the next 15 years.

The Million Dollar Masters Shot

There’s a viral video being passed around on Facebook that shows Vijay Singh sinking an incredible pond skipping shot. The walk-on-water moment is actually from 2009. Surprisingly to many, skipping a ball on water is something of a tradition at the Masters. Attempting the miracle shot is common enough that fans chant, “Skip! Skip! Skip!” if a water hazard gets in a golfer’s way. The 16th hole at Augusta is a prime spot for the stunt, since the tee and the green are divided by a narrow strip of water. Skipping balls on water in that spot is so common that many golfers who don’t skip get booed by the crowd.

Jack Nicklaus: 6 Time Masters Champion

Jack Nicklaus Masters - How Much Golf Do You PlayingJack Nicklaus has won the Masters six times. That’s the most any golfer has taken home the Masters top purse. Nicklaus won $144,000 for his 6th win in 1986.

Nicklaus may have reached curmudgeon status and genius status simultaneously on 4/8/16. That’s when he announced a brilliant solution to a growing problem. We’ll give you the problem first and see if you hit on the same solution. The trouble with golf these days is, the athletes are outgrowing the courses. Golfers are hitting longer and longer drives and playing better and better. Why is that a problem? Tournaments like the Masters are built on differentiating golfers by their scores. When the golfers are all getting on the green in one shot, what divides golf from a high stakes game of mini golf without the windmills? The solution so far has been for courses to spend millions upon millions elongating their holes. As drives get ever longer, only a very few courses can keep up the pace of the expansion. Golf as a spectator sport is threatening to get a lot more boring. Instead of asking, “How much money does a golfer make if he wins the Masters?” people will start asking, “How much do golfers make if ten of them tie for first place?”

So here’s Jack Nicklaus’ “Aha” idea: Don’t change the courses. Change the ball. More specifically, he said, “Change the frigging golf ball.” That one simple change could singlehandedly change the game of golf. A deader ball would shorten drives. It would also mean a ton of money saved in course expansion costs.

Nick Faldo 1st Place Masters Prize Money: $875,000

Nick Faldo won the Masters three times for a total purse of $875,000. The golf master won in two consecutive years: 1989 and 1990. He came back for his third win in 1996 and took home $450,000. Only two golfers have won the Masters more times than that: Jack Nicklaus (6 times), Arnold Palmer (4 times) and Tiger Woods (4 times).

Nick Faldo may not have won the Masters since ’96 but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t still have the juice. On 4/7/16, Faldo pulled off the astounding putt below. The putt has been likened to a shot from Happy Gilmore.

— Oddschecker Au (@OddscheckerAu) April 7, 2016

Tiger Woods 1st Place Masters Prize Money: $3,762,000

Tiger Woods has won the Masters four times and made $3.762 million. His first win came in 1997 with $486,000. Back to back wins in 2001 and 2002 brought him $1,008,000 each. His final win (so far?) in 2005 netted him $1.26 million in prize money. Woods remains the golfer who has won the most golf masters prize money in history.

Woods is still one of the highest paid athletes in history. Reportedly, he earned $50.6 million in 2014. Only $600,000 came from golf, while the other $50 million came from product endorsement deals.

The EA Sports ad below hilariously shows a theory for why Woods was such a phenom in the world of golf.

Phil Mickelson Masters 1st Place Prize Money: $3,735,000

Phil Mickelson has won nearly as much Masters money as Tiger Woods with $3.735 million. Mickelson won $1.17 million in 2004, $1.26 million in 2006 and $1.35 million in 2010.

Phil Mickelson is by no means a golf past master. He not only competed in the 2015 Masters, but he finished second. That gave him another $880,000 in Masters Prize money.

Mickelson is currently tied for 20th place in the Masters 2016. In the clip below from before the tournament, he discusses what it takes to win.

The Masters prize money is $10 million total for 2016. First prize takes $1.8 million and the rest is split up according to the table below. Every player is

Golf Habits

Are you playing golf often enough to improve.

For the past two months I have been conducting a small experiment.

The results are in and they don’t make pleasant reading!

As I wrote on the – About page – the main point of Golf Habits is to question everything I know about golf in an effort to help myself and you guys achieve true potential in golf.

No stone will remain unturned; no question will be unanswered as we go along.

So for the last 2 months I have been trying to find the answer to a simple question:

Is it possible to play well (and even improve) by playing only one round of golf a week and doing absolutely no practice?

I wanted to see how that went as from what I can tell, that is pretty much what the average golfer does.

Which is fine as of course golf is a sport and a pastime for most after all.

But the interesting thing I find is that the golfers who play once a week – still seem to think their game and scores will improve over time.

So, as I am the head guinea pig in this mission, I have been doing the same thing.

But I’m not enjoying the results one bit!

And there is definitely no improvement in sight.

Over the years, as a top level golfer I have generally tried to play at least twice a week and hopefully also do a couple of one hour practice sessions in a week.

To me that is the minimum I needed to do to keep up my game in any sort of reasonable shape but note it is far less than I did back when I was competing professionally.

And my scoring over the past couple of years has reflected that – which I accept.

But I wasn’t expecting what playing once a week and no practice would do to my game.

The result over the last 2 months – is a startling 2 shots per round worse on average – against the same 2 month period last year.

2 shots a round may not sound like a hill of beans to some of you but to me that is huge.

I’d hate to think what that would translate into if I did it for a whole year!

So, what’s the point of all this?

Well, firstly I’m off to the practice area tomorrow (and the next day)

And for the rest of you, if you are serious about improving your game – take some time to read this article that I wrote a while back, answer the questions and work out if you are doing enough to improve.

It’s called Play or practice.

It would be great if we could all just turn up, play once a week, do no extra practice and play better golf – but sadly it’s just not possible.

Improvement in golf, like anything else in life – takes time, application and focus.

Related Articles by Ian Hardie

Are you playing golf often enough to improve. So for the last 2 months I have been trying to find the answer to a simple question. Is it possible to play well (and even improve) by playing only one round of golf a week and doing absolutely no practice? I wanted to see how that went as from what I can tell, that is pretty much what the average golfer does.

How to prepare to play a golf tournament

tournament ready - How Much Golf Do You Playing

Almost all of us who play golf regularly or even occasionally have been in a competitive environment when it comes to the game of golf. Whether it’s your Club Championship, Member Guest, corporate outing or even just your regular Sunday Nassau game, nervousness or anxiousness or even self doubt may not be very far behind. For many, these feelings are a major reason people don’t continue playing golf. Golf seems to take more time than most sports to get a good grasp of how to hit the ball, or even how to act on a golf course. People are afraid to get in an environment where them and their game are exposed for all to see.

So the question becomes how do I control these emotions so that I can play to the best of my ability? As a former college and mini tour player, I, as much as anybody, know how much being able to play every day with continuous repition can help with your game, and most importantly, your confidence. But most of us are not in a position in our lives where playing every day is a possibility. I am now an assistant golf professional at Western Hills Country Club in Cincinnati, where along with loving my job and the people around me, my main focus on a daily basis is making sure my members are happy and that we as a staff are all ready for the events we will be putting on for them in the near future. But one thing is for sure, I have not lost my love of competitive play and look forward to my own upcoming tournament, whenever that may be. One of my goals each and every day is to make sure I have a club in my hand for at least ten minutes. It doesn’t sound like much but even if I can hit balls, putt, or even swinging in a mirror for just a few minutes, mentally I feel that I still have the touch. Now while I realize that most of you aren’t going to do this, just grabbing a club and swing it for a few minutes whenever possible, can make a huge difference on the mental side of the game for you. Jack Nicklaus once said, “The difference between being nervous and scared is being prepared.” When you do show up for that next important round you will feel like you’ve done just that little more than the next guy.

As for when you show up on the day of the event, there a few things that you can do to try and squash that self doubt. While nothing is more important than preparing BEFORE you show up that day, getting there early enough to hit a few of the different shots you’ll face that day can be very reassuring. My routine warming up for a tournament goes like this: Show up a good hour beforehand. First thing I do is go directly to the putting green and hit a lot of long putts to try and establish a feel of the greens. During this first session, I try not to hit any short putts because I don’t want to see anything miss quite yet! After about fifteen minutes, it’s on to the driving range where I work through the bag starting with the lob wedge and hitting a few with every other club. What I would highly recommend doing when you’re warming up is to try and get yourself nervous. I know this sounds odd, but try and visualize a few shots from the course and think to yourself “this shot counts”. This not only will give you a better idea how you’re hitting it that day, but when you get to that particular shot on the course, it will feel a little easier since you’ve already hit it. Almost all golfers, when they get under some pressure, tend to speed up their swing and get too quick, so while you’re warming up, really focus on that tempo and balance. When you finally work up to that driver, make sure you hit a few shots envisioning you’re on that first tee. It will make a big difference when you finally stand up there. After I’m done, warming up, it’s to the chipping area for a few bunker and chip shots, then back to the putting green where I try and see as many 4 footers go in as I can.

Going through a routine like this will only make you feel more prepared when your big round starts but nothing is going to cure you of all your nerves. I try to remember that being nervous is why I play the game. I try to embrace being in a position where my shots mean something, and even though it’s easier said than done, this is the kind of attitude you need to find before you step on that first tee. After all, golf is a game, it’s meant to be fun, it’s not life and death, so don’t be afraid of failure and believe in your abilities. And remember, the guy standing next to you is going through the same emotions you are!!

Almost all of us who play golf regularly or even occasionally have been in a competitive environment when it comes to the game of golf.

How Far Is Walking 18 Holes?

78629898 - How Much Golf Do You Playing

Expect to walk between 3 and 6 miles while golfing.

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Play a round of regulation 18-hole golf on most courses and you’ll walk anywhere between 3 and 6 miles, depending on the length of the course, how much walking you do before and after your game, and how often you have to wander off course in search of lost balls. You can better estimate how far you’ll walk while playing a round of golf using a simple calculation that translates golf course yardage into miles.

Distance

A regulation 18-hole golf course should be between 6,200 and 7,000 yards. To calculate how many miles you walk from the first tee to the 18th tee, multiply the number of yards by three (the number of feet in a yard) and then divide the result by 5,280 (the number of feet in a mile). For example, a 6,500-yard golf course is equal to 19,500 feet (6,500 x 3) or 3.69 miles (19,500 divided by 5,280).

Considerations

Not all walking during a round of golf takes place between the first and the 18th tee. Richard Fellner, who has reviewed golf courses around the world, says using golf course yardage to estimate how far you walk during a round of golf ignores the walking you do prior to starting, such as walking from the clubhouse to the practice tee, as well as the walking you do while you play, such as from your cart to the tee box. To refine your estimate for how far you walk while playing a round of golf, add a little extra to your yards-based calculations. For example, adding 1,000 yards to your estimate, for a 6,500-yard golf course, increases how far you walk during a round of golf from 3.69 miles to 4.26 miles.

Measurement

To precisely measure how far you walk during a round of golf, wear a pedometer, which will measure how many steps you take. Measuring how many steps you take from the moment you get out of your car to the moment you get back into it will give you a precise accounting of how far you walked during that round of golf. Typically, walking 1,000 steps is equal to walking about a half a mile. Walking 7,000 steps during a round of golf is equal to walking 3.5 miles.

Benefits

Walking at least 30 minutes every day can result in a host of health benefits, according to the American Council on Exercise. Walking every day can help lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, increase your energy and stamina, help you reach weight-loss goals and improve bone strength. Next time your ball lands in the rough, thinking those extra steps you’ll walk from your cart to the ball will help improve your overall health may take the sting out of finishing above par.

References (4)

About the Author

William Henderson has been writing for newspapers, magazines and journals for more than 15 years. He served as editor of the “New England Blade” and is a former contributor to “The Advocate.” His work has also appeared on The Good Men Project, Life By Me and The Huffington Post.

Play a round of regulation 18-hole golf on most courses and you’ll walk anywhere between 3 and 6 miles, depending on the length of the course, how much walking you do before and after your game, and how often you have to wander off course in search of lost balls. You can better estimate how far you’ll walk while …

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