How To

Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

How to Teach a Beginner to Swing a Golf Club

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Although the best way to learn golf is to take lessons from a PGA professional, some beginners prefer to have a parent or friend teach them the basic fundamentals of the game. Responsibility comes with teaching golf, because if the student does not have a pleasant experience with the lessons, there is a possibility he will give up on learning the game and miss out on potentially many years of fun.

Go to a driving range at a local course or to a practice facility with the beginning golfer. Purchase a bucket of balls and proceed to the practice area. Show the beginning golfer how to do some light stretching to loosen the back, shoulder and leg muscles before the practice session.

Demonstrate each step of the golf swing. Don’t just tell the student what to do. You learn the game more quickly by emulating someone else’s technique.

Start with a sound grip. Show the student how to grasp the club first with the left hand, almost like he is shaking hands with it, then wrap the right hand around the club with the little finger of the right hand placed snugly into the space between the index and middle fingers of the left hand. This is the popular Vardon grip.

Introduce the correct stance and posture. Demonstrate alignment by placing a club on the ground pointed at the target and a second club parallel to the first to align the feet. Have her place his feet along this line and square her hips parallel to the target line. Tell her to address the ball by bending forward from the hips, with knees slightly flexed and her feet shoulder width apart. Make sure her back in flat and that she is not slouching or reaching for the ball with the club.

Start with short swings at first, one-quarter of the way back. Pick clubs that are easier to hit, such as a 9-iron rather than a 5-iron or driver. Let him swing without a ball at first, so he gets the feel of the swing. Then have your student just work on making contact with the ball. This will build his confidence. Let him gradually lengthen his swing to a half swing and then three-quarters. Make sure he does not overswing in an attempt to hit the ball as far as you do.

Introduce the concept of weight shift. Show him how the weight shifts from the left side to the right side on the backswing, and reverses on the downswing. Watch to see that he does not sway outside the edge of the right foot.

Spend time on the practice green during each lesson. Let him get the reinforcement of hitting a chip shot close to the hole and sinking a putt.

Make the first time on the course as stress free as possible. Tee off on the first hole by yourself and let him take his first shot from the fairway. This will eliminate first tee jitters he might have. If he’s having a particularly bad hole, let him pick his ball up and start fresh on the next hole.

Although the best way to learn golf is to take lessons from a PGA professional, some beginners prefer to have a parent or friend teach them the basic fundamentals of the game. Responsibility comes with teaching golf, because if the student does not have a pleasant experience with the lessons, there is a possibility he will give up on learning the game and miss out on potentially many years of fun.

Beginner Golf Swing Drill: Doubling Up for Success

When most beginner golfers first start learning how to swing a golf club, they do what feels right and don’t know to focus on developing a stroke that follows a proper swing plane. However, staying on the swing plane is essential to maintain a solid and consistent golf stroke, so it’s important to teach the concept of the swing plane to beginners right away. In this lesson, we teach you a simple beginner golf swing drill you can utilize to ensure your swing follows the proper path away from and through the ball, each and every time.

The three-step beginner golf swing drill

Rather than letting golfers just starting out swing and swing to eventually develop a comfortable swing that sends the ball straight, we recommend starting with beginner golf swing plane training. To help train new golfers to follow the swing plane, PGA Professional Ali Jean Wells demonstrates a simple three-step beginner golf swing drill that warms golfers progressively into a natural swing that’s on plane.

First in Ali’s beginner golf swing three-step drill, she teaches you how to get used to pulling the club over your shoulder during the backswing and follow-through, bending your right arm at the start and your left at the finish. Next in the beginner golf swing drill, you’ll learn how to double up for success. Ali shows you how to use two clubs to further develop a proper swing plane, being sure to keep the clubs parallel and never let them touch.

Once you’ve gotten comfortable with the first two steps, you can ditch the second club and use just one to practice a consistent, straight beginner golf swing. Focus on getting the club over your shoulder and bending the correct arm, and you’ll have a beautiful beginner golf swing that’s on plane!

Looks like it will give juniors lots of fun with the double club drill!

Teach new golfers to take the club back over their shoulders with this beginner golf swing drill that trains proper swing plane.

The 4 Best Video Golf Lessons For Beginners

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Why learn to play golf?

There are several reasons, so let’s take a quick look at the most important ones. First, we live extremely busy lives in the 21st century. It seems that 24 hours in a day is not enough to do all that we have to do as we try to pack in all of the chores and commitments. We are in a constant rush.

Learning to play golf does two main things: it gets us out into the fresh air when we have been stuck in an office all week, and it requires a lot of concentration. This second point is probably the main one. When you have to concentrate so hard on the shot that you are about to take at that moment, all of your worries disappear. They have to, because your mind is suddenly 100% on the shot, so everything else vanishes. There is no room left for fears, worries, and frustrations, so golf gives you mental relaxation and peace of mind.

Certainly, other things come into play such as your competitive instinct and the pleasure of a couple of drinks at the 19th hole, but overall, golf gives you RELAXATION in an otherwise demanding dog-eat-dog world.

The Best Ways To Learn Golf

With that in mind, let’s take a look at the best ways to learn golf. Obviously there is nothing to beat physical practice out on the course with an instructor who has been there and done that, but it is not possible to spend as much time as you might like doing that. Furthermore, a golf pro costs money, which of itself may be a restriction.

Fortunately, the internet has come to our rescue with the advent of YouTube. It is now possible to spend a few minutes here and there learning how to play golf by watching other people doing it on video in the comfort of your own home.

If you type “golf for beginners” into YouTube you come up with about 131,000 results. If they averaged 10 minutes in length it would take you about 2 years doing nothing else day and night to watch them all.

Since we guessed you probably didn’t have that much time we have sorted through them for you and found the best golf lessons for beginners on YouTube. Here are the top four I’ve found.

The Swing

One of the first things that you need to master is your swing. We found a great video by Andy Proudman and Piers Ward which has had nearly four million views. It’s called Golf Swing Made Simple and runs for less than seven minutes.

Andy begins by pointing out that the object is to hit the ball in a reasonably straight line, but that a lot of beginners think that in that case the swing should be directly behind the ball and follow through in a straight line. However, that is not the case. The club does not travel in a straight line, but in an arc. The club is raised behind the golfer’s body so it is not directly behind the ball. As the swing commences it travels down the first part of the arc and – it is to be hoped – connects with the ball at exactly the point where it will send it in the direction we want, and then continues in its arc finishing up above the golfer’s left shoulder (or right, in the case of a left-handed player).

Next, the pair make the point that the angle at which the club face strikes the ball is critical. This is demonstrated with – of all things – a tennis racquet.

Then Piers demonstrates that you can practise with small swings so that you get used to turning your body in the correct arc in order for the clubface to strike the ball at the correct angle, and play some shots like this before increasing your swing in order to drive the ball down the fairway. To begin with you only need to hit the ball 20 yards.

Piers further points out that he has taught golfers who have been playing for ten years who still think that the club should be played in a straight line in relation to the ball.

Andy goes on to say that learning the swing is what he calls “concepting” – in other words grasping the concept that the club is swung in an arc rather than in a straight line.

Golf Swing Made Simple is a great video and one which we thoroughly recommend.

Beginner Golf Basics

Beginner Golf Basics – Part 1 is the first in a series of four videos, also by Piers Ward and Andy Proudman, and starts right at the beginning by defining the various parts of a golf club – the grip, the shaft, the club head, the face, and the leading edge.

Next Piers shows you the stance with his feet apart at about shoulder width, and the ball slightly ahead of the centre of his body. The feet are turned slightly outwards. He then describes how to aim the body and achieve the target line.

Next up is the correct way to hold the club. Andy says that when they take on a new pupil, whether he has been playing for six months or ten years, the way that he holds the club is the first thing that they both look at in order to ascertain if there are any problems with it. They go into considerable detail about how to hold the club, showing the back of the leading hand facing the direction in which the ball is required to go and referring to how to “close” the hand on to the grip rather than the term ”grip” the club which is the word many people use. In fact, they use the term “hold” the club rather than “grip” as they say that they don’t want you to “grip” the club too tightly. Then they go into more detail about how to use the other hand, showing a “V” shape between the thumb and the grip.

In fact, Piers says that many people hold the grip too tightly, especially after they have just missed a shot: the tendency is to “grip” the club even more tightly which is not what you should do.

Next up is a description of the body motion during the swing. Piers shows you how to practise this without a golf club. You put your arms around your front and “hug” yourself. Then you place the feet into the correct position as described earlier and “wind up” the body keeping the lower body stable. You then move your body towards the target and turn your body. The weight is now all on your lead leg and the other foot just has the toes in contact with the ground, the spikes of your shoes pointing away behind you. The right knee is “on top” of the left knee.

This completes the “set up” and the pair now go on to discuss the swing. Piers demonstrates a short swing which only drives the ball a short distance. He then shows a longer swing, thus driving the ball further.

To complete the video, the pair emphasise that you do not need to keep hitting the ball: it is more important to practise the movements correctly until you are confident with them.

Beginner Golf Basics – Part 1 is the first in a series of four videos and has had over 70,000 views in its’ first three weeks on YouTube. It is well worth a look.

Golf for Dummies

Golf For Dummies is by Australian champion golfer Brett Ogle. This is also the first in a series, and goes into considerable detail on how to choose the equipment that you need. Basically, as Brett says, all you really need to play golf are some clubs and some balls.

However, how do you know which are the best golf clubs for you? There are golf clubs with steel shafts and golf clubs with graphite shafts (much more expensive, but lighter in weight). There are big headed golf clubs, cavity back golf clubs, and many more.

When choosing them you have to consider your height, build, and strength. If you are tall, you probably need longer and stiffer shafts. You can get standard, mid-sized, and over-sized club heads. Brett recommends over-sized heads for the beginner as they are much more forgiving. He also suggests that you start by getting a putter and a few irons. Your objective is to get used to the correct action: distance should be the last thing to worry about when you are a beginner.

Brett emphasises that you need to find out what is the best type of club for your build, body type, and your game. He says that there is no point wasting money on expensive clubs until you know what is the best type for you.

Having discussed clubs at considerable length, Brett then goes on to consider balls and also reminds you to buy tees.

After this, he suggests that you should always warm up before playing golf, even if it is only on the practice range. Although golf is not as physical an activity as some sports, you use a considerable number of muscles so a regular warm up routine is essential. Five or ten minutes of stretching can help to avoid pulled muscles, or even more serious injuries.

Finally in this video Brett goes on to demonstrate some simple warm-up exercises that you should always do before playing a round or playing on the practice range.

Putting For Beginners

We found a great video on putting by Harold Swash and Phillip Kenyon.

Harold says that there are four fundamentals to good putting. To begin with the blade has to be square to the target at both the address and strike positions. The second fundamental is the importance of keeping the blade of the putter square through the path of the hitting area.

The third fundamental is to strike the ball with a slight upstroke. This gives the ball a forward roll. The way to achieve this is to position yourself so that the ball is two inches forward of your sternum. Phillip Kenyon demonstrates how to do this.

Finally, every putt is a straight putt and you must strike the ball with a smooth acceleration so that you control the speed of the ball. Many amateurs either hit the ball with a short backswing and a hurried hit, or a long backswing with deceleration, both of which will cause the ball to veer off course.

This video is only around five minutes long, but puts into perspective exactly what it is that you may be doing incorrectly. One of the best on putting that we have seen.

The Four Best Golf Lessons For Beginners

So there you have it. In our view the best golf lessons for beginners from some of the best professionals around. Take our advice and go and watch them all.

One Comment

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Hi, I’m Rob West – a scratch golfing wannabe, and one-time victor of a (no names mentioned) ex-England International at foursomes. Just glad I had a good partner!

Welcome to Birdieable, a golf blog for players and fans of all skill levels. Please have a look around, and if you want to get involved, you can start by rating my swing!

Why learn to play golf? There are several reasons, so let's take a quick look at the most important ones. First, we live extremely busy lives in the 21st

9 Best Golf Clubs For Beginners Reviews – Tee off like a Pro in 2018

Looking for the best golf clubs beginners can pick up and play with ease? They aren’t hard to find, but choosing the perfect set to suit your needs is an entirely different story. If you’re ready to start your new obsession, keep reading as our experts have just the thing for you.

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Our leaders

81f6bOZU1VL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Nice mix of standard and hybrid clubs

Excellent intermediate set

The bag could be better

51v8oDrnIFL. SL1000  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Large, comfortable grips

Forgiving irons and woods

Excellent build quality

Not for budget-conscious beginners

716QQYpF1NL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Large 460cc driver

Excellent quality for the price

You may want more irons

Lighter clubs aren’t for everyone

71zhQBeFkRL. SL1371  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Tiny titanium drivers

High-quality bag with stand & straps

An expensive set to outgrow

Also good products

71ER4wd1x1L. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Designed for seniors looking for a set of forgiving lightweight clubs.

61ec3iEhTQL. SL1200  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

A high-end set built for beginners that want the best.

71vgKQYsyDL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Affordable and efficient clubs that won’t break the bank.

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Graphite shafts and perimeter weighting are just two highlights of this set.

71zhQBeFkRL. SL1371  1 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

For beginners looking for basic budget-friendly clubs.

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How We Decided

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My grandfather picked up my first set of Dunlop clubs as a Christmas present when I was a teen. While I don’t get to play regularly these days, I have dented plenty of drivers over the years and spent a considerable amount of time at the 19th hole.

In-depth review

Golf has often been called the Game of Kings although you don’t need to be royalty to enjoy the sport. When just starting out, the best golf clubs beginners should consider need to meet a few strict requirements while pros have no shortage of options.

If you’re at the beginning of your journey, you’ve definitely come to the right place. Our experts reviewed the top golf sets for rookies and put together a guide which covers everything from what “lie” means to accessories you should never leave home without.

Research You Can Trust

Consumers looking to hit the links for the first time have a lot to consider beforehand. While your choice of attire or golf ball is worthy of its own list, we set our sights on golf club sets built for beginners. While there are literally thousands of options on the market, our options had to meet specific criteria to make the cut.

Our team spent countless hours reading firsthand reviews from users around the globe, and put that knowledge to work alongside our own expertise in this field. We also took a few polls to find out what new users are looking for as well. After a lengthy debate, we settled on the options you see below…

The 30-Second Review Of The Best Golf Clubs Beginners Need To Try

If you’re headed out to play 18 holes next weekend, you’re not going to have time to get custom fitted clubs or dig through hundreds of bag and club combos. While our guide is quick and to the point there are still a few areas you can focus on when time is of the essence…

Start by simply going for sets which are suitable for your handedness.

Choices are limited for lefties, so that alone may narrow the field considerably. After you come to grips with the grip, you’ll want to look at the driver. Check the size of the head (bigger is usually better) along with the shaft. You may not use it often, but the driver is a very important club.

Irons can have a steel or graphite shaft and will get more use than your driver or fairway woods, so durability is essential along with the materials used in the head.

You’ll also want to check the quality of the bag along with the putter style. Blade putters are the most common, but mallet putters may be more suitable for beginners.

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By the way, do you have golf pants that are ready for the action?

Golf Club Set Buying Guide for Beginners

There is a huge gap between good and great when it comes to golf equipment. The quality of the clubs can give you a huge advantage on the course or hinder your progress if they are substandard. With that in mind, here are the areas you’ll need to key in on if you’re new to the sport and don’t currently own a set of clubs.

How Much Are You Willing To Spend?

Golf is an expensive sport, but you don’t have to be a doctor or lawyer to afford a decent set of clubs. You do need to think of how much you want to spend initially however along with how often you think you’ll actually play. In other words, if you’re unsure how you’ll take to golf, don’t spend an arm and a leg on a set of clubs.

On the other hand, if you’ve gone to driving ranges or play the occasional round with borrowed clubs, it may be time for a proper set. We’re not talking about a set of Maruman Majesty clubs either, but something geared towards beginners – not clubs that require a bank loan. With that in mind, our team has something for everyone whether you’re spending a grand or a few hundred bucks.

Just keep in mind, the phrase “you get what you pay for” rings true in the golf world more than with other products. A set of Cobras will outlast clubs from Dunlop or Wilson, and the chances of your clubhead flying across the course decrease as well.

How Many Clubs Are In A Set?

It all depends on the set you’ve got your eyes on and can vary quite wildly. One manufacturer may think a “set” involves around eight clubs and a bag while others give you the full 12 clubs… or more. Unfortunately, the phrasing used by most manufacturers is inaccurate so you’ll need to proceed with caution and take those titles with a grain of salt.

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Whenever a manufacturer says they have an 18-piece golf club set, they mean it literally. The bag counts as a piece, and so do those head covers. While straps and other accessories are excluded from this marketing gimmick, you’ll want to count the clubs before getting too excited. How many clubs you actually need varies as well although there are a few simple guidelines to follow and “standard” clubs found in every set.

You’ll always get a driver along with a few fairway woods and several irons. Wedges are hit or miss in cheaper sets, but something we recommend as you’re bound to find the sand sooner than later if you’re just starting out. The official USGA limit is 14 clubs per bag, but the average is usually 12 clubs although you can get by with 11 or even 10 in some cases.

Golf Club Anatomy 101

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Golf terms can be confusing, but the gear is easy to wrap your head around. Your main piece of equipment lives up to its name considering a golf club is actually shaped like a club. That doesn’t mean you don’t need to have a grasp on what different parts of the club do.

Which is why we’re going to take a quick anatomy lesson…

  • Grip – This is where you’ll put your hands to grip the club, and it’s usually made of rubber or an exotic composite with a catchy name. There are different sizes and types of grips including oversized variants, but it’s not an area to spend too much time on. That’s because you replace them if you don’t like the feel or just prefer a different brand of grip.
  • Shaft – After the grip is the shaft which runs the length of the club down the hosel and head. What you’ll want to focus on here are the materials used which are usually steel or graphite. Your swing or clubhead speed determines the type of shaft you may need as well, and there are several levels to choose from.If a shaft is designated as an R, it’s regular and ideal for golfers with an average swing speed of between 70 to 80 mph. You can find both graphite and steel shafts in this class with X, or extra stiff shafts are built for high-speed swingers over 90 mph.In the middle, you have Stiff clubs marked with an S, and on the low end, there are clubs labeled A and L. The former are for senior golfers and the latter or for ladies. Both typically use graphite shafts to increase swing speed while stiff clubs can be graphite or steel shafted.
  • Hosel – No for something less complicated – the hosel. Otherwise known as a neck, the hosel attaches the shaft to the club. It can be straight or angled depending on the design which can directly affect the lie angle of the club and the loft.There are also adjustable hosels for drivers that professionals can install on some clubs, and others have that feature built-in. You can change the loft of a driver in seconds on clubs like the Ping G30, a fairway wood with five different settings. You won’t find adjustable hosels on any of the clubs in our sets but should have them high on your list when it’s time to add to your bag.
  • Club Head – The head is the largest part of the club and where the magic happens. On drivers, the trend is the bigger, the better as those oversized heads have larger sweet spots which means you’ve got more room for error. Titanium is the most common option with drivers on the high end as it has an excellent strength to weight ratio.Stainless steel is also a popular option across the board along with carbon steel in irons and wedges. The USGA has rules in place to regulate how fast a ball can come off the club, so there are limits to the size and materials used. The head is important, but so is the face which is the part that makes contact with the ball – when you hit properly.

Those are just the most critical parts of the golf club, and the things most commonly mentioned by manufactures. If you want to learn more about the face and physics behind a good golf swing, be sure to give this a quick read.

Types Of Golf Clubs

Now that you understand the most important parts of the clubs in your bag, it’s time to talk about what they’re used for and what to expect. We’ve also included a yardage estimate for “average” golfers although those results will vary depending on just how green you are.

If you’ve played a few rounds, feel free to skip ahead as you already know the differences between a fairway wood and an iron.

  • Woods– Drivers are in the wood family and live up to their name as they “drive” the ball down the fairway towards the cup. It’s also arguably the most important club in your bag considering it’s the first one you’ll use. If you shank your first shot into the rough, it’s going to have an impact on the rest of the hole.Pros can get around 280 to 300 yards from a driver on a regular basis. Rookies are lucky to get 150 without some practice, but the average is around 180 – 200 for most adults.There are drivers built for the fairways as well. Fairway woods are basically baby drivers and provide you with distance off the fairway or the tee on occasion. They have a similar construction to drivers, but with smaller heads. We aren’t going to put a range on these as there are too many variables like hybrid clubs and irons.
  • Hybrids – Is it a wood or is it an iron? That may be the first question to spring to mind when you set eyes on a hybrid club. These clubs are designed to bridge the gap between fairway woods and lower irons, and it usually replaces a few clubs in your bag.Clubs of this nature often have a head similar to a fairway driver but designed to give your shots more loft. It’s a personal preference although one that’s becoming more common as they perform as advertised and lighten up your bag a bit.
  • Irons – Once the ball leaves the tee, it’s generally time to break out the irons on shorter holes. These clubs cover the distance from the fairway to the cup and vary depending on the set. If a hybrid is included along with several fairway drivers, you may only get the 6-iron through the 9-iron in your bag.As for the range, an average male can drive the ball around 160 yards with a 5-iron while a 9-iron is good for 120-130 yards in ideal conditions. You can typically expect roughly 10-15 yards difference between the irons depending on your skill level, the clubs, and mother nature.If you prefer a full range of clubs, you’ll want to look for a set that includes irons 3 through 9. If the manufacturer mentions cavity back irons, they are far more forgiving than blade-style irons. You can learn more about the iron styles here as they are similar to the next clubs in your bag.
  • Wedges – Unless you’re rocking a high-end set, you’ll probably just have one wedge in your bag – two if you’re lucky. The first one would be the pitching wedge, which can also fall into the “iron” class as well. It’s the club you’ll want when there’s around 100 yards between the ball and the green. A sand wedge will get you out of those pesky traps in a stroke… or three depending on your level of skill.The average range on a sand wedge is probably around 70 yards for beginners, but a pro may squeeze 100 out with no problem. A lob wedge is ideal for shorter distances while a gap wedge is sandwiched between the pitching and sand wedges.
  • Putter – While you may start each hole with a driver, you’ll finish it with a putter in most cases unless you sink an Ace or Eagle. Like every other club in your bag, there are many tricks manufacturers can use to set their putter apart from the rest and two main styles with mallet and blade putters.Blade putters have been around for decades, and are what you’ve used on a putt-putt course – everyone will be familiar with these. Mallet putters are larger, and becoming more popular by the day but aren’t ideal if you have an arc stroke.

Swing Weight & Sizing

Despite the name, swing weight has nothing to do with how much your club weighs, so there’s no need to head for a scale. It’s actually how a club feels when you swing it, something you’ll notice quickly when taking practice swings with a Cobra before jumping to a Wilson. It’s also a measurement as fulcrums are used, and there is an official scale.

We’re not going to get too technical as there are different trains of thought on swing weight. Some manufacturers stagger the weight throughout the set from the driver to the putter while others believe the set should retain the same swing weight so they’ll feel the same. This is going to be another area that comes down to personal preference, something tough to figure out when if you’ve never taken a swing.

Sizing can be tricky for beginners, even if manufacturers provide you with precise measurements. You’ll need to understand what those terms mean and have a rough idea of what size clubs you’ll need as well. We can help you with terminology, and many companies have their own sizing charts which give you the scoop based on your height.

The More You Know…

We’re not going to talk about bogeys, Eagles or the proper technique for an explosion shot out of a trap. Instead, we’re going to discuss things like for loft and forgiveness.

  • Forgiving – While not a term used on the course, the best golf clubs for beginners are usually ones deemed “forgiving” by the manufacturer and it’s a term you’ll frequently encounter in our guide or when looking for new clubs.
    Simply put, this means the club is constructed to forgive you when you take a bad swing or strike the ball off center. Those are things you’ll do more often than not when you’re hitting the links for the first time.
  • Fore – Arguably the most important term you’ll need to know, fore is what you’ll yell whenever you think a ball you’ve struck may strike someone else. It’s a warning, and if you hear it, you’ll want to be wary as a golf ball can cause significant damage. While you may not necessarily need to jump under a cart, don’t take the word lightly.
  • Par – On a golf course, this is the number of strokes you have to get the ball from the tee box to the cup or hole. It’s always par 3, 4 or 5 unless you’re playing something wild like the Sano Course in Japan which has an insane 964-yard par 7 hole.
  • Bogey & Birdie – When you’re one stroke over par, it’s called a Bogey. One under par is called a Birdie.
  • Loft – Whenever the word loft is related to a golf club, it means the angle on the club face. This dictates the trajectory and varies depending on the club. Drivers typically have a lower loft while wedges are set higher. More loft equals more height, something you’ll want on approach shots when control is crucial.
  • Lie – This can mean more than just one thing and is cause for confusion with beginners. With clubs, it relates to the sole or bottom of the club and its angle compared to the shaft. It also means the condition of the ground surrounding your ball after it’s struck. Want to see someone take it out of heavy rough with a bad lie? Check this out…

  • 19thHole – Yes, a golf course only has 18-holes, but you will often hear people talk about the 19th. This magical place is actually the clubhouse or bar, where golfers go after they’ve sunk the last putt of the day.

Those are just a few terms you’re likely to encounter your first time out. If you want to learn what a flange is or a topped shot, be sure to give this a good read.

Additional Tools Of The Trade

While all our sets will get you started, they will only get you so far unless you want to pony up at the pro shop. Before you can head to the driving range or dream about playing 18 holes, you’ll need to have a few essential accessories in your bag.

  • Shoes – Certain sports require specialty footwear and golf just happens to be one of them. Golf shoes are cleated and give you extra grip when you transfer your weight during a swing. While they aren’t necessarily required (many courses allow other shoes), they are something to consider seriously.You can buy golf shoes with fixed cleats or ones with that you can remove or change out on a whim. The latter requires a bit more maintenance, but either style will work, and some look like ordinary sneakers.
  • Gloves – Baseball players use gloves for a reason, and so do golfers. Perfecting the right golf grip is easier said than done, and it’s critical when you want control at the point of impact. A good golf glove gives you additional grip which can keep the club from turning in your hand.Personally, I use the Dura Feel from Nike, but Callaway, TaylorMade, and all the top brands make golf gloves as well. It’s another item you don’t have to use, but one we highly recommend.
  • Tees – The golf tee is the simplest piece of gear in your back and something you’ll need before playing a round. Your ball is placed on the tee in a tee box or teeing ground at the beginning of each hole. While height certainly matters, there are different types of tees on the market today.Wood is the most popular option, and any bag will do whether they are from Pride Professional or something off the rack at the Pro shop. Plastic tees are popular as well, and there are even specialty tees that claim to add yardage to your drives as well.
  • Balls – There far too many golf balls to begin to list and each manufacturer claims theirs is better than the rest. Cheaper balls are covered with Surlyn while the more expensive ones have an urethane covering.Golf balls covered with Surlyn fly at a higher trajectory than their urethane counterparts but won’t have nearly as much spin. On the other hand, urethane balls are easier to damage and cost more to replace. There are advantages and disadvantages to each style although many golfers count the Titleist V1x among the best.

Those are just a few essentials you’ll need or want to consider before you load up your clubs and roll out. Other items include golf towels, divot tools, ball markers and even sunblock or bug spray depending on the course and conditions. Mosquitos don’t care if you’re playing the back 9 or a full 18 holes…

Reviews: The Best Golf Clubs Beginners Need To Know About

We’ve included sparse sets for beginners along with advanced ones from top-tier brands. What you won’t find are any golf club sets that lack the essentials, so all our options come complete with a bag, putter, driver and several irons at a minimum.

Callaway Men’s Strata Ultimate Complete Golf Set

81f6bOZU1VL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Callaway gained many fans in their Big Bertha days, and the brand has expanded considerably since then. While you can still score a Great Big Bertha driver, the Strata Ultimate set provides you with every club you’ll need before hitting the links.

The Strata lineup comes in several different flavors, but we went with the 12 club set. The extra clubs add quite a bit of value and are ones you’re more likely to use than not. First, we’re going to start with the driver which is made from titanium with a massive sweet spot. It’s 45-inches long with a 12-degree loft and a lie of 58-degrees. It’s a D1 club as are the rest of the clubs aside from the sand wedge which is a D3.

The other woods…

In addition to the regular driver, you’ll receive two fairway drivers with a 3-wood and 5-wood along with a couple of hybrid clubs. The 4H is 38.5-inches while the 5H is a hair shorter. Both have a similar lie, and all four of these clubs have a higher loft. You can check out the tech specs for the drivers and irons in the chart below.

Presentation1 e1534862537308 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

The hybrids clubs replace the traditional long iron in this bag, so if you want a 5-iron, you’ll need to pick one up separately. While you probably won’t need it, we recommend the Rogue X if you prefer to keep your clubs within the Callaway family.

61pgNC2adrL. SL1166  245x300 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For BeginnersOutside of the main clubs, you’ll also receive a pitching wedge, sand wedge, and a putter. The wedges have the same length and lie, but the pitching wedge is a 46-degree loft while the sand wedge clocks in at 56-degrees. The wedges and irons are stainless feature “high flight” tech which is quite forgiving, and the putter has a milled face for increased accuracy when it’s time to send the ball to its home. It’s the same length as the wedges, but with a 3.5-degree loft and 72-degree lie.

No golf set is complete without a bag, one requirement all our choices had to meet to make our list. The Callaway Strata Ultimate set comes with a sturdy bag that sports a built-in stand and enough pockets to hold all your gear – even a pair of shoes. You’ll still need to pick up balls and tees, but there are five covers to protect your drivers and a padded back strap.

These clubs are available for both left and right-handed golfers and have a very reasonable price tag considering the brand and the fact you’re getting 12 clubs. They are covered by a 2-year warranty against defects in workmanship but not against fits of rage so don’t take it out on the clubs if you shank one into the tall grass.

Features

  • Large titanium driver
  • 12 club set
  • High flight technology
  • Left and Right-handed models available

Looking for the best golf clubs beginners can pick up and play with ease? They aren’t hard to find, but choosing the perfect set to suit your needs is an entirely different story. If you’re ready to start your new obsession, keep reading as our experts have just the thing for you.

9 Best Golf Clubs For Beginners Reviews – Tee off like a Pro in 2018

Looking for the best golf clubs beginners can pick up and play with ease? They aren’t hard to find, but choosing the perfect set to suit your needs is an entirely different story. If you’re ready to start your new obsession, keep reading as our experts have just the thing for you.

22 264x300 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

pexels photo 274133 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Our leaders

81f6bOZU1VL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Nice mix of standard and hybrid clubs

Excellent intermediate set

The bag could be better

51v8oDrnIFL. SL1000  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Large, comfortable grips

Forgiving irons and woods

Excellent build quality

Not for budget-conscious beginners

716QQYpF1NL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Large 460cc driver

Excellent quality for the price

You may want more irons

Lighter clubs aren’t for everyone

71zhQBeFkRL. SL1371  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Tiny titanium drivers

High-quality bag with stand & straps

An expensive set to outgrow

Also good products

71ER4wd1x1L. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Designed for seniors looking for a set of forgiving lightweight clubs.

61ec3iEhTQL. SL1200  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

A high-end set built for beginners that want the best.

71vgKQYsyDL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Affordable and efficient clubs that won’t break the bank.

41TLZ86AJjL - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Graphite shafts and perimeter weighting are just two highlights of this set.

71zhQBeFkRL. SL1371  1 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

For beginners looking for basic budget-friendly clubs.

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How We Decided

22 264x300 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

My grandfather picked up my first set of Dunlop clubs as a Christmas present when I was a teen. While I don’t get to play regularly these days, I have dented plenty of drivers over the years and spent a considerable amount of time at the 19th hole.

In-depth review

Golf has often been called the Game of Kings although you don’t need to be royalty to enjoy the sport. When just starting out, the best golf clubs beginners should consider need to meet a few strict requirements while pros have no shortage of options.

If you’re at the beginning of your journey, you’ve definitely come to the right place. Our experts reviewed the top golf sets for rookies and put together a guide which covers everything from what “lie” means to accessories you should never leave home without.

Research You Can Trust

Consumers looking to hit the links for the first time have a lot to consider beforehand. While your choice of attire or golf ball is worthy of its own list, we set our sights on golf club sets built for beginners. While there are literally thousands of options on the market, our options had to meet specific criteria to make the cut.

Our team spent countless hours reading firsthand reviews from users around the globe, and put that knowledge to work alongside our own expertise in this field. We also took a few polls to find out what new users are looking for as well. After a lengthy debate, we settled on the options you see below…

The 30-Second Review Of The Best Golf Clubs Beginners Need To Try

If you’re headed out to play 18 holes next weekend, you’re not going to have time to get custom fitted clubs or dig through hundreds of bag and club combos. While our guide is quick and to the point there are still a few areas you can focus on when time is of the essence…

Start by simply going for sets which are suitable for your handedness.

Choices are limited for lefties, so that alone may narrow the field considerably. After you come to grips with the grip, you’ll want to look at the driver. Check the size of the head (bigger is usually better) along with the shaft. You may not use it often, but the driver is a very important club.

Irons can have a steel or graphite shaft and will get more use than your driver or fairway woods, so durability is essential along with the materials used in the head.

You’ll also want to check the quality of the bag along with the putter style. Blade putters are the most common, but mallet putters may be more suitable for beginners.

pexels photo 424732 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

By the way, do you have golf pants that are ready for the action?

Golf Club Set Buying Guide for Beginners

There is a huge gap between good and great when it comes to golf equipment. The quality of the clubs can give you a huge advantage on the course or hinder your progress if they are substandard. With that in mind, here are the areas you’ll need to key in on if you’re new to the sport and don’t currently own a set of clubs.

How Much Are You Willing To Spend?

Golf is an expensive sport, but you don’t have to be a doctor or lawyer to afford a decent set of clubs. You do need to think of how much you want to spend initially however along with how often you think you’ll actually play. In other words, if you’re unsure how you’ll take to golf, don’t spend an arm and a leg on a set of clubs.

On the other hand, if you’ve gone to driving ranges or play the occasional round with borrowed clubs, it may be time for a proper set. We’re not talking about a set of Maruman Majesty clubs either, but something geared towards beginners – not clubs that require a bank loan. With that in mind, our team has something for everyone whether you’re spending a grand or a few hundred bucks.

Just keep in mind, the phrase “you get what you pay for” rings true in the golf world more than with other products. A set of Cobras will outlast clubs from Dunlop or Wilson, and the chances of your clubhead flying across the course decrease as well.

How Many Clubs Are In A Set?

It all depends on the set you’ve got your eyes on and can vary quite wildly. One manufacturer may think a “set” involves around eight clubs and a bag while others give you the full 12 clubs… or more. Unfortunately, the phrasing used by most manufacturers is inaccurate so you’ll need to proceed with caution and take those titles with a grain of salt.

golf club sets e1534876237375 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Whenever a manufacturer says they have an 18-piece golf club set, they mean it literally. The bag counts as a piece, and so do those head covers. While straps and other accessories are excluded from this marketing gimmick, you’ll want to count the clubs before getting too excited. How many clubs you actually need varies as well although there are a few simple guidelines to follow and “standard” clubs found in every set.

You’ll always get a driver along with a few fairway woods and several irons. Wedges are hit or miss in cheaper sets, but something we recommend as you’re bound to find the sand sooner than later if you’re just starting out. The official USGA limit is 14 clubs per bag, but the average is usually 12 clubs although you can get by with 11 or even 10 in some cases.

Golf Club Anatomy 101

golf club anatomy - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Golf terms can be confusing, but the gear is easy to wrap your head around. Your main piece of equipment lives up to its name considering a golf club is actually shaped like a club. That doesn’t mean you don’t need to have a grasp on what different parts of the club do.

Which is why we’re going to take a quick anatomy lesson…

  • Grip – This is where you’ll put your hands to grip the club, and it’s usually made of rubber or an exotic composite with a catchy name. There are different sizes and types of grips including oversized variants, but it’s not an area to spend too much time on. That’s because you replace them if you don’t like the feel or just prefer a different brand of grip.
  • Shaft – After the grip is the shaft which runs the length of the club down the hosel and head. What you’ll want to focus on here are the materials used which are usually steel or graphite. Your swing or clubhead speed determines the type of shaft you may need as well, and there are several levels to choose from.If a shaft is designated as an R, it’s regular and ideal for golfers with an average swing speed of between 70 to 80 mph. You can find both graphite and steel shafts in this class with X, or extra stiff shafts are built for high-speed swingers over 90 mph.In the middle, you have Stiff clubs marked with an S, and on the low end, there are clubs labeled A and L. The former are for senior golfers and the latter or for ladies. Both typically use graphite shafts to increase swing speed while stiff clubs can be graphite or steel shafted.
  • Hosel – No for something less complicated – the hosel. Otherwise known as a neck, the hosel attaches the shaft to the club. It can be straight or angled depending on the design which can directly affect the lie angle of the club and the loft.There are also adjustable hosels for drivers that professionals can install on some clubs, and others have that feature built-in. You can change the loft of a driver in seconds on clubs like the Ping G30, a fairway wood with five different settings. You won’t find adjustable hosels on any of the clubs in our sets but should have them high on your list when it’s time to add to your bag.
  • Club Head – The head is the largest part of the club and where the magic happens. On drivers, the trend is the bigger, the better as those oversized heads have larger sweet spots which means you’ve got more room for error. Titanium is the most common option with drivers on the high end as it has an excellent strength to weight ratio.Stainless steel is also a popular option across the board along with carbon steel in irons and wedges. The USGA has rules in place to regulate how fast a ball can come off the club, so there are limits to the size and materials used. The head is important, but so is the face which is the part that makes contact with the ball – when you hit properly.

Those are just the most critical parts of the golf club, and the things most commonly mentioned by manufactures. If you want to learn more about the face and physics behind a good golf swing, be sure to give this a quick read.

Types Of Golf Clubs

Now that you understand the most important parts of the clubs in your bag, it’s time to talk about what they’re used for and what to expect. We’ve also included a yardage estimate for “average” golfers although those results will vary depending on just how green you are.

If you’ve played a few rounds, feel free to skip ahead as you already know the differences between a fairway wood and an iron.

  • Woods– Drivers are in the wood family and live up to their name as they “drive” the ball down the fairway towards the cup. It’s also arguably the most important club in your bag considering it’s the first one you’ll use. If you shank your first shot into the rough, it’s going to have an impact on the rest of the hole.Pros can get around 280 to 300 yards from a driver on a regular basis. Rookies are lucky to get 150 without some practice, but the average is around 180 – 200 for most adults.There are drivers built for the fairways as well. Fairway woods are basically baby drivers and provide you with distance off the fairway or the tee on occasion. They have a similar construction to drivers, but with smaller heads. We aren’t going to put a range on these as there are too many variables like hybrid clubs and irons.
  • Hybrids – Is it a wood or is it an iron? That may be the first question to spring to mind when you set eyes on a hybrid club. These clubs are designed to bridge the gap between fairway woods and lower irons, and it usually replaces a few clubs in your bag.Clubs of this nature often have a head similar to a fairway driver but designed to give your shots more loft. It’s a personal preference although one that’s becoming more common as they perform as advertised and lighten up your bag a bit.
  • Irons – Once the ball leaves the tee, it’s generally time to break out the irons on shorter holes. These clubs cover the distance from the fairway to the cup and vary depending on the set. If a hybrid is included along with several fairway drivers, you may only get the 6-iron through the 9-iron in your bag.As for the range, an average male can drive the ball around 160 yards with a 5-iron while a 9-iron is good for 120-130 yards in ideal conditions. You can typically expect roughly 10-15 yards difference between the irons depending on your skill level, the clubs, and mother nature.If you prefer a full range of clubs, you’ll want to look for a set that includes irons 3 through 9. If the manufacturer mentions cavity back irons, they are far more forgiving than blade-style irons. You can learn more about the iron styles here as they are similar to the next clubs in your bag.
  • Wedges – Unless you’re rocking a high-end set, you’ll probably just have one wedge in your bag – two if you’re lucky. The first one would be the pitching wedge, which can also fall into the “iron” class as well. It’s the club you’ll want when there’s around 100 yards between the ball and the green. A sand wedge will get you out of those pesky traps in a stroke… or three depending on your level of skill.The average range on a sand wedge is probably around 70 yards for beginners, but a pro may squeeze 100 out with no problem. A lob wedge is ideal for shorter distances while a gap wedge is sandwiched between the pitching and sand wedges.
  • Putter – While you may start each hole with a driver, you’ll finish it with a putter in most cases unless you sink an Ace or Eagle. Like every other club in your bag, there are many tricks manufacturers can use to set their putter apart from the rest and two main styles with mallet and blade putters.Blade putters have been around for decades, and are what you’ve used on a putt-putt course – everyone will be familiar with these. Mallet putters are larger, and becoming more popular by the day but aren’t ideal if you have an arc stroke.

Swing Weight & Sizing

Despite the name, swing weight has nothing to do with how much your club weighs, so there’s no need to head for a scale. It’s actually how a club feels when you swing it, something you’ll notice quickly when taking practice swings with a Cobra before jumping to a Wilson. It’s also a measurement as fulcrums are used, and there is an official scale.

We’re not going to get too technical as there are different trains of thought on swing weight. Some manufacturers stagger the weight throughout the set from the driver to the putter while others believe the set should retain the same swing weight so they’ll feel the same. This is going to be another area that comes down to personal preference, something tough to figure out when if you’ve never taken a swing.

Sizing can be tricky for beginners, even if manufacturers provide you with precise measurements. You’ll need to understand what those terms mean and have a rough idea of what size clubs you’ll need as well. We can help you with terminology, and many companies have their own sizing charts which give you the scoop based on your height.

The More You Know…

We’re not going to talk about bogeys, Eagles or the proper technique for an explosion shot out of a trap. Instead, we’re going to discuss things like for loft and forgiveness.

  • Forgiving – While not a term used on the course, the best golf clubs for beginners are usually ones deemed “forgiving” by the manufacturer and it’s a term you’ll frequently encounter in our guide or when looking for new clubs.
    Simply put, this means the club is constructed to forgive you when you take a bad swing or strike the ball off center. Those are things you’ll do more often than not when you’re hitting the links for the first time.
  • Fore – Arguably the most important term you’ll need to know, fore is what you’ll yell whenever you think a ball you’ve struck may strike someone else. It’s a warning, and if you hear it, you’ll want to be wary as a golf ball can cause significant damage. While you may not necessarily need to jump under a cart, don’t take the word lightly.
  • Par – On a golf course, this is the number of strokes you have to get the ball from the tee box to the cup or hole. It’s always par 3, 4 or 5 unless you’re playing something wild like the Sano Course in Japan which has an insane 964-yard par 7 hole.
  • Bogey & Birdie – When you’re one stroke over par, it’s called a Bogey. One under par is called a Birdie.
  • Loft – Whenever the word loft is related to a golf club, it means the angle on the club face. This dictates the trajectory and varies depending on the club. Drivers typically have a lower loft while wedges are set higher. More loft equals more height, something you’ll want on approach shots when control is crucial.
  • Lie – This can mean more than just one thing and is cause for confusion with beginners. With clubs, it relates to the sole or bottom of the club and its angle compared to the shaft. It also means the condition of the ground surrounding your ball after it’s struck. Want to see someone take it out of heavy rough with a bad lie? Check this out…

  • 19thHole – Yes, a golf course only has 18-holes, but you will often hear people talk about the 19th. This magical place is actually the clubhouse or bar, where golfers go after they’ve sunk the last putt of the day.

Those are just a few terms you’re likely to encounter your first time out. If you want to learn what a flange is or a topped shot, be sure to give this a good read.

Additional Tools Of The Trade

While all our sets will get you started, they will only get you so far unless you want to pony up at the pro shop. Before you can head to the driving range or dream about playing 18 holes, you’ll need to have a few essential accessories in your bag.

  • Shoes – Certain sports require specialty footwear and golf just happens to be one of them. Golf shoes are cleated and give you extra grip when you transfer your weight during a swing. While they aren’t necessarily required (many courses allow other shoes), they are something to consider seriously.You can buy golf shoes with fixed cleats or ones with that you can remove or change out on a whim. The latter requires a bit more maintenance, but either style will work, and some look like ordinary sneakers.
  • Gloves – Baseball players use gloves for a reason, and so do golfers. Perfecting the right golf grip is easier said than done, and it’s critical when you want control at the point of impact. A good golf glove gives you additional grip which can keep the club from turning in your hand.Personally, I use the Dura Feel from Nike, but Callaway, TaylorMade, and all the top brands make golf gloves as well. It’s another item you don’t have to use, but one we highly recommend.
  • Tees – The golf tee is the simplest piece of gear in your back and something you’ll need before playing a round. Your ball is placed on the tee in a tee box or teeing ground at the beginning of each hole. While height certainly matters, there are different types of tees on the market today.Wood is the most popular option, and any bag will do whether they are from Pride Professional or something off the rack at the Pro shop. Plastic tees are popular as well, and there are even specialty tees that claim to add yardage to your drives as well.
  • Balls – There far too many golf balls to begin to list and each manufacturer claims theirs is better than the rest. Cheaper balls are covered with Surlyn while the more expensive ones have an urethane covering.Golf balls covered with Surlyn fly at a higher trajectory than their urethane counterparts but won’t have nearly as much spin. On the other hand, urethane balls are easier to damage and cost more to replace. There are advantages and disadvantages to each style although many golfers count the Titleist V1x among the best.

Those are just a few essentials you’ll need or want to consider before you load up your clubs and roll out. Other items include golf towels, divot tools, ball markers and even sunblock or bug spray depending on the course and conditions. Mosquitos don’t care if you’re playing the back 9 or a full 18 holes…

Reviews: The Best Golf Clubs Beginners Need To Know About

We’ve included sparse sets for beginners along with advanced ones from top-tier brands. What you won’t find are any golf club sets that lack the essentials, so all our options come complete with a bag, putter, driver and several irons at a minimum.

Callaway Men’s Strata Ultimate Complete Golf Set

81f6bOZU1VL. SL1500  - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

Callaway gained many fans in their Big Bertha days, and the brand has expanded considerably since then. While you can still score a Great Big Bertha driver, the Strata Ultimate set provides you with every club you’ll need before hitting the links.

The Strata lineup comes in several different flavors, but we went with the 12 club set. The extra clubs add quite a bit of value and are ones you’re more likely to use than not. First, we’re going to start with the driver which is made from titanium with a massive sweet spot. It’s 45-inches long with a 12-degree loft and a lie of 58-degrees. It’s a D1 club as are the rest of the clubs aside from the sand wedge which is a D3.

The other woods…

In addition to the regular driver, you’ll receive two fairway drivers with a 3-wood and 5-wood along with a couple of hybrid clubs. The 4H is 38.5-inches while the 5H is a hair shorter. Both have a similar lie, and all four of these clubs have a higher loft. You can check out the tech specs for the drivers and irons in the chart below.

Presentation1 e1534862537308 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For Beginners

The hybrids clubs replace the traditional long iron in this bag, so if you want a 5-iron, you’ll need to pick one up separately. While you probably won’t need it, we recommend the Rogue X if you prefer to keep your clubs within the Callaway family.

61pgNC2adrL. SL1166  245x300 - Best Club To Learn Golf Swing For BeginnersOutside of the main clubs, you’ll also receive a pitching wedge, sand wedge, and a putter. The wedges have the same length and lie, but the pitching wedge is a 46-degree loft while the sand wedge clocks in at 56-degrees. The wedges and irons are stainless feature “high flight” tech which is quite forgiving, and the putter has a milled face for increased accuracy when it’s time to send the ball to its home. It’s the same length as the wedges, but with a 3.5-degree loft and 72-degree lie.

No golf set is complete without a bag, one requirement all our choices had to meet to make our list. The Callaway Strata Ultimate set comes with a sturdy bag that sports a built-in stand and enough pockets to hold all your gear – even a pair of shoes. You’ll still need to pick up balls and tees, but there are five covers to protect your drivers and a padded back strap.

These clubs are available for both left and right-handed golfers and have a very reasonable price tag considering the brand and the fact you’re getting 12 clubs. They are covered by a 2-year warranty against defects in workmanship but not against fits of rage so don’t take it out on the clubs if you shank one into the tall grass.

Features

  • Large titanium driver
  • 12 club set
  • High flight technology
  • Left and Right-handed models available

Looking for the best golf clubs beginners can pick up and play with ease? They aren’t hard to find, but choosing the perfect set to suit your needs is an entirely different story. If you’re ready to start your new obsession, keep reading as our experts have just the thing for you.

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